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NFT: How do you get rid of coyotes

mavric : 7/8/2017 12:23 pm
I live in upstate in a fairly rural area, but certainly not deep woods. My home is sandwiched between Route 81 (a main north-south thruway) and a parallel road Route 11. The two roads are about 200 yards apart.

I've had issues with coyotes before and ended up shooting one with my .270 after it kept coming right up to the house in broad daylight looking for food. I had several run ins with it for over a year and it got bolder and bolder and refused to run when I confronted it. I have a bunch of grandchildren who love to play in the yard on the swing set, monkey bars, and trampoline. My brothers and sisters have small kids that come over all the time and play in the yard as well as nieces and nephews with their small children, so I don't like coyotes that close.

Now there is a litter of pups that routinely play in the yard and aren't that afraid of people. They watch me mow the lawn with curiosity rather than fright. When I park my car, they stop playing long enough to watch me get out of the car and walk to the door, then return to playing.

I love nature and am fascinated with the bald eagles, weasels and mink, coyotes, and the occasional bear and even wild pigs, etc., but I just don't want to shoot these little coyotes that I fear are going to become a big problem in a very short while.

The DEC is closed this weekend, but I was going to call them Monday morning to see if there's a way to capture them and take them into the deeper woods somewhere.

Any other suggestion is welcome.

I took a few pictures this morning of them playing in the yard or the flower box by the shed.







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RE: mavric  
rebel yell : 7/8/2017 2:20 pm : link
In comment 13523122 Joey in VA said:
Quote:
Where in VA are you? I live off of 66/29 and have had coyotes encroaching until bears showed up, then they seemed to f off.

Joey, I think he's referring to upstate NY. My guess is somewhere toward Watertown. I'd assume there's lots of critters moving in and out of the Adirondacks.
RE: mavric  
mavric : 7/8/2017 2:22 pm : link
In comment 13523122 Joey in VA said:
Quote:
Where in VA are you? I live off of 66/29 and have had coyotes encroaching until bears showed up, then they seemed to f off.


I live in Upstate New York, not VA. If you drew a triangle between Syracuse, Binghamton, and Ithaca - I'd be in it and that area is my stompin grounds.

Rt 81 and Rt 11 runs through both Syracuse and Binghamton. Coyotes are especially plentiful in the Castle Creek / Whitney Point area where they are found dead on 81 almost on a daily basis. I live between Whitney Point and Cortland where they are becoming more plentiful, but not as prolific as Castle Creek.

Although, the strip of land between the two highways is not ideal for coyotes to make a home, that's what they've chosen to do. The further they go away from Route 81, the deeper and safer the woods where it's far more rural. Seems odd that the mother would decide to raise a brood of pups in such a rather populated area when a mile in any direction away from 81 would make more sense.
RE: That is cool  
mavric : 7/8/2017 2:29 pm : link
In comment 13523130 Route 9 said:
Quote:
I wish they'd visit my neighborhood and come meet some of the kids here.

Keep shooting them?


I hate shooting them. I love dogs and they look too much like dogs...and I can't kill a dog. If they went after one of my grandchildren, I'd shoot it without hesitation. But they are just curious, playful pups right now. Last week they looked like furry kittens. They've doubled in size in a week. They won't be a threat to kids for a few more months. By the time they are 7 - 8 months, they'll be skilled hunters and big enough to be a threat to small children and pets. And they see everything from the point of view that "if it moves, it must be food". That's why I want to get them removed before they get to that point.
Spray  
XBRONX : 7/8/2017 2:32 pm : link
some mountain lion scent.
RE: RE: Forget fences or walls.  
MOOPS : 7/8/2017 2:35 pm : link
In comment 13523107 pjcas18 said:
Quote:
In comment 13523070 MOOPS said:


Quote:


They'll scale an 8 foot fence or wall without a problem.

Here's a DEC link that might help you out. Link - ( New Window )



Also from DEC:



Quote:


.....
Fencing your yard may deter coyotes. The fence should be tight to the ground, preferably extending six inches below ground level, and taller than 4 feet.



for a Coyote to scale an 8 foot fence (which is definitely possible) you'd need to have something on the other side they can smell and be starving otherwise.

They venture into fenceless yards b/c of the opportunity


In my previous house I had one that would sit on a six foot high block post overlooking an arroyo while he scanned for dinner.

Best bet to get rid of the pack is probably to make life as annoying for them as you can. They'll eventually move to some extent but you'll still be in their hunting zone and they'll venture through on occasion.
the fearlessness is concerning  
fkap : 7/8/2017 2:43 pm : link
but rest assured, the coyotes are there whether you see them or not. You're never going to be coyote free. they're in suburbs everywhere, and in cities, too. 99.9 % of the time, they are not anything to worry about (if you're human. cats and small dogs have cause for concern).

Don't relocate the pups unless you relocate Momma, too.
Get a large dog  
Archer : 7/8/2017 3:06 pm : link
There are some large dog breeds that are specifically bred to protect a house from wild animals.
I live in an area with a lot of wildlife including Black Bears, Foxes, wild dogs, coyotes, etc.
The animals will not come into our yard but will go to the neighbors. Our dogs establish their territory by marking the area.
We have had Akitas and our last dog was a Boerboel ( by far and away the best dog for this type of situation)
.  
ghost718 : 7/8/2017 3:20 pm : link


Don't play around with them  
capone : 7/8/2017 3:55 pm : link
Especially in a pack - a child in particular is not safe
RE: the fearlessness is concerning  
Cam in MO : 7/8/2017 4:02 pm : link
In comment 13523152 fkap said:
Quote:
but rest assured, the coyotes are there whether you see them or not. You're never going to be coyote free. they're in suburbs everywhere, and in cities, too. 99.9 % of the time, they are not anything to worry about (if you're human. cats and small dogs have cause for concern).

Don't relocate the pups unless you relocate Momma, too.


This. I'm amazed you see them. There's one or more packs near the farm. We hear them yipping and howling almost every night, but have never seen them. We don't worry about the horses, or even the barn cats- the pack(s) for whatever reason stay in the woods and never venture into the pastures, much less one of the barns. Raccoons on the other hand are keniving pieces of shit. I'd shoot them on sight, but my family is a bunch of hippies that believe in catch and release (a few miles across the river, at least.)
a fence  
spike : 7/8/2017 4:10 pm : link
or an electric fence?
RE: the fearlessness is concerning  
mavric : 7/8/2017 4:11 pm : link
In comment 13523152 fkap said:
Quote:
but rest assured, the coyotes are there whether you see them or not. You're never going to be coyote free. they're in suburbs everywhere, and in cities, too. 99.9 % of the time, they are not anything to worry about (if you're human. cats and small dogs have cause for concern).

Don't relocate the pups unless you relocate Momma, too.


I agree. I see coyotes all the time, but they are always on the run and trying to hide so they can't be seen. Other than the one I finally shot, coyotes are very skittish and high tail it out of there once they know you can see them. These pups come right out in broad daylight and don't run. They seem very curious about humans. When I mowed last week they simply came out, sat on their haunches and watched like they were amazed. That's not normal IMO. Of course, this is the first time I've had an entire litter of pups near the house - at least that I know of. I'm surprised the mother hasn't taught them to run for their lives and hide whenever a human is around. They'll probably learn. Especially once hunting season starts and they get shot at by deer hunters and especially those guys who strictly hunt coyotes.
RE: a fence  
pjcas18 : 7/8/2017 4:14 pm : link
In comment 13523214 spike said:
Quote:
or an electric fence?


the kind of electric fence I think you mean only works when your pet has a collar that make the pet receive a shock when they touch the fence.

If you mean this, it's kind of dangerous for his kids too, and probably very expensive.

Den???  
Buzzard64 : 7/8/2017 7:06 pm : link
You would not have baby coyotes on your lawn unless their den is in close proximity. You need to locate the den. Once located you have options but by all means after they grow up and disperse destroy that den or your problem will be back next year. Depending on your sensibilities you could also destroy the den before they grow up and move on.
PJ  
ctc in ftmyers : 7/8/2017 7:34 pm : link
Actually compared to conventional fences they are cheap.

Every kid has to learn own their own no matter how you warn them. I have some on my property I know I had to try for myself when I was a kid and then we used to dare guys to do it in our teens and early 20's.

Marvic, shoot them now.
Shoot 'em with paintballs  
T in NJ : 7/8/2017 8:05 pm : link
Hopefully that does the job of scaring them off.
And the other problem  
T in NJ : 7/8/2017 8:08 pm : link
is in the Northeast, they are not just coyote but coywolf or coywolfdog hybrids.
OK, maybe not coywolf, but definitely hybrids - ( New Window )
And they are a problem all over  
T in NJ : 7/8/2017 8:10 pm : link
.
New York is being overrun - ( New Window )
Is that deliquent taking a crap in your garden?  
short lease : 7/8/2017 8:37 pm : link
They have to go ... cool picture but, I wouldn't stand for that either.


Did you try to reason with them?


I would tell them - "Look, I grew up with your Uncle "Wiley E" and he would be very disappointed with this behavior".

I have a shit ton of them around me  
Johnny5 : 7/8/2017 10:41 pm : link
And I have never heard one incident of them messing with people. Though they will pick off small dogs and cats. They skirt my property though because I have loud dogs.

I say leave em be. I doubt they will bother you.
RE: I have a shit ton of them around me  
BMac : 7/8/2017 11:02 pm : link
In comment 13523468 Johnny5 said:
Quote:
And I have never heard one incident of them messing with people. Though they will pick off small dogs and cats. They skirt my property though because I have loud dogs.

I say leave em be. I doubt they will bother you.


The levels of paranoia combined with cluelessness here are scarier than coyotes.
RE: I have a shit ton of them around me  
mavric : 7/8/2017 11:42 pm : link
In comment 13523468 Johnny5 said:
Quote:
And I have never heard one incident of them messing with people. Though they will pick off small dogs and cats. They skirt my property though because I have loud dogs.

I say leave em be. I doubt they will bother you.


I tend to agree. Personally, I love being around nature and all that goes with it. I find wild animals fascinating, but not so much that I'll invade their space or threaten them. When they wake me up in the middle of the night fighting over a rabbit or whatever the pack caught, it's loud and irritating. I've gotten up several times over the years and opened the door and yelled, "will you shut the fuck up and let me sleep". They are so loud when they are packed and fighting.

Actually, the ONLY reason I worry at all is because I have so many small kids that play in the yard and I can't watch over them every minute. That is the only reason I want them to move away to better hunting grounds.
Mountain Lions  
Percy : 7/9/2017 7:55 am : link
Could get a couple of these to police the place. Of course, then you'd have to worry a little about them, too.
our coy dogs don't bother with us much  
gidiefor : Mod : 7/9/2017 8:33 am : link
and we have a well established dog running around hte property
RE: RE: I have a shit ton of them around me  
pjcas18 : 7/9/2017 8:46 am : link
In comment 13523478 BMac said:
Quote:
In comment 13523468 Johnny5 said:


Quote:


And I have never heard one incident of them messing with people. Though they will pick off small dogs and cats. They skirt my property though because I have loud dogs.

I say leave em be. I doubt they will bother you.



The levels of paranoia combined with cluelessness here are scarier than coyotes.


Yeah, there's tons of paranoia here. great post.
You should get a hold of some  
Diver_Down : 7/9/2017 8:46 am : link
Sex Panther. Douse up and patrol your property's perimeter. 60% of the time, it works everytime.
RE: RE: RE: I have a shit ton of them around me  
ctc in ftmyers : 7/9/2017 2:52 pm : link
In comment 13523542 pjcas18 said:
Quote:
In comment 13523478 BMac said:


Quote:


In comment 13523468 Johnny5 said:


Quote:


And I have never heard one incident of them messing with people. Though they will pick off small dogs and cats. They skirt my property though because I have loud dogs.

I say leave em be. I doubt they will bother you.



The levels of paranoia combined with cluelessness here are scarier than coyotes.



Yeah, there's tons of paranoia here. great post.


I wouldn't worry about the kids, but if you have any kind of live stock, you don't want them around. They cost you money.

Then again  
ctc in ftmyers : 7/9/2017 2:57 pm : link
They can make you money. Coyote pelts were the bright spot.
Link - ( New Window )
Coyote  
pjcas18 : 7/9/2017 3:07 pm : link
attacks on pets and joggers/walkers/hikers happen in Mass at an increasing rate. I assume in NY too.

you take away their habitat they are forced to enter yours.

I wouldn't worry about the pups in the picture, my first thought was the mother was killed somehow (hit by a car, hunter, etc.), but adult coyotes are absolutely a threat to small children.

not sure if that qualifies as paranoia though so I'll wait until a passive aggressive poster comments on it (not you ctc)
Try a motion activated  
Les in TO : 7/9/2017 4:49 pm : link
Hoseless sprinkler
Teach the kids to shoot long guns.  
Beezer : 7/9/2017 8:21 pm : link
Done.
you can call these guys  
Houston : 7/10/2017 2:31 pm : link
ACME Coyote Removal :>)
My Nephew came over without my knowledge  
mavric : 7/11/2017 10:31 am : link
and shot at one with a .22. They are very smart animals and haven't seen them since. I told him, "man, if you're going to shoot them, you need an automatic (semi for you non-gunners) shotgun with 00 Buck Shot and take them all out at once. All he did with a .22 is teach them to stay out of sight from now on. It certainly hasn't driven them away and I can still hear them at night and they aren't a mile away - they're close to the house in the brush.
There's no reason to be alarmed  
Ron Johnson 30 : 7/11/2017 10:46 am : link
unless you have outdoor pets like a cat. A coyote isn't going to grab a child off a swing set.
Sure, let your kids pet them  
pjcas18 : 7/11/2017 10:58 am : link
some of you act like experts you don't know a damn thing are are offering awful advice and it seems like Mavric knows better anyway, and reality is Coyotes will absolutely consider a child prey. Maybe not pups, but adult coyotes are a threat to humans, not saying shoot them or anything else, but saying "they won't bother you if you don't bother them" or other stupid shit like that is how you wind up with tragedies.

just an excerpt about some attacks in suburban Mass.

Quote:
....BOSTON

High school sophomore Jed Aubertin took his dog for a walk down a dirt trail in late February, and a coyote attacked him.

"I didn't have time to square off with it," Aubertin said. "I went for my knife, but it was already in the air at my neck."

Coyote attacks on humans are considered rare, but they can be vicious when they happen, like the bite on a 2-year-old girl's head in Weymouth or on 9-year-old Alex Cazmay in Haverhill.

"I thought it was a dog," Cazmay said. "That's why I put my hand out. Then, it bit me."

Often it's the smaller animals, like rabbits, running into trouble when it's a one-on-one fight. In farmer Tyler Kimball's case, a pack of coyotes made a meal out of his $1,200 buffalo.

"And when I see a coyote, I am going to shoot him," Kimball said.

Each of these stories happened in the last year in Massachusetts or New Hampshire.

Then, there was the wild run at the Ted Williams Tunnel. A coyote on the loose scampered through the Big Dig.

If it seems like they're showing up everywhere these days, it's because they are.

"Even if you haven't seen coyotes in your area, it's best to assume that they could be in your yard," said Laura Conlee of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Wildlife biologists estimate the summer population in Massachusetts will hold steady at about 10,000, including their pups.....
Just  
Carl in CT : 7/11/2017 11:02 am : link
shoot them. Enough said
My experience  
mavric : 7/11/2017 11:29 am : link
is limited. But I took advice from a DEC officer who I spent some time with while on vacation. He is called into bear sightings all the time. He said that bears are naturally afraid of people so he uses three different styles to deal with them and in almost every case, it's at a garbage dump and they are scrounging for food.

1) he uses large firecrackers to get their attention. 90% of the time, the bear will run for the hills and they pose no threat at all

2) When they don't run, he uses a special gun that shoots rubber bullets. This usually makes the more stubborn ones run for the hills

3) When a bear doesn't respond to firecrackers or rubber bullets and seems unafraid of humans, they shoot the bear dead using 300 Win. Mag hollow points.

As long as a wild animal runs away from you, they are not a threat. It's when they don't run it becomes an issue.

My experience with the coyote that I finally shot a couple years ago was interesting. I had seen him numerous times for over a year. But one day I went outside to have a smoke and there he was about 30 ft away concentrating on a field mouse. So I said, "HEY!" He looked up at me and at first just stared. But he didn't run. So I said, "Look - Fire" as I held up my lighter and lit it. Instead of running, he cocked his head to the side like he was curious. So I said, "you're supposed to run asshole", but he didn't. I then thought to myself, "I am not giving my yard up to a coyote" so I took a couple of quick steps towards him. Instead of running, he took a couple of steps towards me. That made me nervous. So I started running right at him and he took off, but not very far. He hid behind a tree and poked his head out to see what I was doing and snarling at me. So I said to myself, "fuck this, I'm going back inside". Then he took off. A while later he was coming right to the house looking for garbage or food right in the broad daylight. So I got out my .270 and popped him. I felt like shit killing it, but he had just gotten too bold and unafraid.

Bottom line: once coyotes no longer fear you - they are dangerous as hell, just like any wild animal.
Relocating means killing them  
Lawrence_Taylor_56 : 7/11/2017 5:00 pm : link
Just in case the snowflakes don't understand that.

There isn't some animal control farm upstate where trapped skunks, bears, raccoons, and coyotes sing kumbaya by the river.
mavric?  
Buzzard64 : 7/12/2017 2:31 pm : link
No response to my input concerning a Den? Those pups just do not show up at your place for the Hell of it. Seriously....their den is close by. Young carnivores rarely travel from home base until they get large enough for Mom to train them to hunt and feed themselves. In the meantime Mom hunts and the pups hang out at your place...which is their home too. Find the den and destroy it.
I found a dead racoon carcas  
batman11 : 7/12/2017 2:56 pm : link
on our property, this past weekend, that had been killed and eaten. We live in a very wooded area in Northern Westchester, near the Putnam border. I am assuming it was coyote(s). We hear them frequently at night in the distance yipping and yapping. When they take down, what we presume are small deer, the sounds are absolutely primal. We have seen them from time to time over the many years we have lived here, usually just crossing through our property. We now have a 20 pound Sheltie that we are having to keep very, very close to us and on leash. The local animal control guys tell us that coyotes have taken small dogs off patios and from yards in the area recently. We want to coexist with the wildlife, but these assholes are becoming a pretty big nuisance!
RE: mavric?  
mavric : 7/12/2017 5:56 pm : link
In comment 13526478 Buzzard64 said:
Quote:
No response to my input concerning a Den? Those pups just do not show up at your place for the Hell of it. Seriously....their den is close by. Young carnivores rarely travel from home base until they get large enough for Mom to train them to hunt and feed themselves. In the meantime Mom hunts and the pups hang out at your place...which is their home too. Find the den and destroy it.


I'd draw a map our my property, but don't know how and you'd understand. I have about 25 acres of land. I'd say it's shaped like a big "T" with my house at the base of the "T", except that the left hand side of the T is filled in. The right side of the T belongs to my neighbor and the den is on his property. It's overgrown brush and tall grass. He thinks the coyotes are cool and doesn't want to blow up the den.

I found one on my property a couple years back and destroyed it. There was a woodchuck hole under an old scrub apple tree that suddenly was about 20 inches in diameter and much deeper than when woodchucks lived in it. I suspect coyotes dug it up to get to the woodchuck and then decided it would make a good home.
RE: I found a dead racoon carcas  
mavric : 7/12/2017 6:05 pm : link
In comment 13526514 batman11 said:
Quote:
on our property, this past weekend, that had been killed and eaten. We live in a very wooded area in Northern Westchester, near the Putnam border. I am assuming it was coyote(s). We hear them frequently at night in the distance yipping and yapping. When they take down, what we presume are small deer, the sounds are absolutely primal. We have seen them from time to time over the many years we have lived here, usually just crossing through our property. We now have a 20 pound Sheltie that we are having to keep very, very close to us and on leash. The local animal control guys tell us that coyotes have taken small dogs off patios and from yards in the area recently. We want to coexist with the wildlife, but these assholes are becoming a pretty big nuisance!


Yup, the more populated they become, the food supply goes down. They feed primarily on rabbits and field mice or moles, but they will take down a small deer and we have a case in my town where coyotes killed and half ate a calf.

The most dangerous time for a doe giving birth to a fawn is during the actual birth. Coyotes can smell it for a mile and the newborn fawn doesn't stand a chance if they find it.

But year, any small animal is food to them. I'm not sure they actually eat foxes and dogs, but see them as competition for food or competition for the land they've staked out as their own. I pay very close attention to the nature in my back yard and there are times when the yard is covered with rabbits and woodchucks up on the hill. And there aren't any coyotes. Then a year later there won't be a rabbit or woodchuck to be seen anywhere because the coyotes have cleaned them out. So it goes back and forth like high tide low tide, only in year long intervals. I always felt sorry for the rabbits. Their only role in life is a food source for foxes, bobcats, and coyotes. They survive because the breed nonstop and have big litters. By the time a rabbit is three months old, it's already having more baby rabbits. Their lifespan in coyote and fox infested areas is about 4 or 5 months....if they're lucky!
RE: Coyote  
ctc in ftmyers : 7/12/2017 7:12 pm : link
In comment 13523769 pjcas18 said:
Quote:
attacks on pets and joggers/walkers/hikers happen in Mass at an increasing rate. I assume in NY too.

you take away their habitat they are forced to enter yours.

I wouldn't worry about the pups in the picture, my first thought was the mother was killed somehow (hit by a car, hunter, etc.), but adult coyotes are absolutely a threat to small children.

not sure if that qualifies as paranoia though so I'll wait until a passive aggressive poster comments on it (not you ctc)


Thanks PJ

Dusk is the time to watch when you are walking your little dog or letting young kids play at the edge of cover. It's just common sense. There are the outliers naturally. just like teaching you kids what a rattle snake sounds like and to run

A few years back I was in with a group that leased 20,000 acres of Lykes Brothers land called rainy slough. We had the quail rights so we could train our bird dogs there. There were other leasor's who had the deer, turkey, and hog rights.

Quail are actually way down on a coyote's prey list. Too much energy to exert on little energy return. They pray on quail nest predators such as coons, opossums, skunks, hogs,etc.

I am with you that Marvic is answering his own question. Get a dog or a critter (donkey), that will run them off the pproperty.



RE: mavric  
Rover : 7/12/2017 10:42 pm : link
In comment 13523122 Joey in VA said:
Quote:
Where in VA are you? I live off of 66/29 and have had coyotes encroaching until bears showed up, then they seemed to f off.

That's where I live, I'm at the Trinity Center all the time.
Gotta think I've crossed paths with you at some point.
RE: RE: mavric?  
Rover : 7/12/2017 10:46 pm : link
In comment 13526690 mavric said:
Quote:
In comment 13526478 Buzzard64 said:


Quote:


No response to my input concerning a Den? Those pups just do not show up at your place for the Hell of it. Seriously....their den is close by. Young carnivores rarely travel from home base until they get large enough for Mom to train them to hunt and feed themselves. In the meantime Mom hunts and the pups hang out at your place...which is their home too. Find the den and destroy it.



I'd draw a map our my property, but don't know how and you'd understand. I have about 25 acres of land. I'd say it's shaped like a big "T" with my house at the base of the "T", except that the left hand side of the T is filled in. The right side of the T belongs to my neighbor and the den is on his property. It's overgrown brush and tall grass. He thinks the coyotes are cool and doesn't want to blow up the den.

I found one on my property a couple years back and destroyed it. There was a woodchuck hole under an old scrub apple tree that suddenly was about 20 inches in diameter and much deeper than when woodchucks lived in it. I suspect coyotes dug it up to get to the woodchuck and then decided it would make a good home.

Ummm, what happens if you destroy their den?
Get yourself one of these  
Gary from The East End : Admin : 7/13/2017 9:12 am : link
Rover  
Buzzard64 : 7/13/2017 9:52 am : link
When you destroy the den the coyotes will move on. Mavrics situation with the little coyotes is totally due to their den being close by. A bunch of young ones simply do not just show up day after day in one location. They are there because their den is there. By destroying the den you force an immediate relocation and as well eliminate future repeats of Momma Coyote having a litter there again.
RE: Rover  
Rover : 7/13/2017 11:20 am : link
In comment 13527014 Buzzard64 said:
Quote:
When you destroy the den the coyotes will move on. Mavrics situation with the little coyotes is totally due to their den being close by. A bunch of young ones simply do not just show up day after day in one location. They are there because their den is there. By destroying the den you force an immediate relocation and as well eliminate future repeats of Momma Coyote having a litter there again.

It wouldn't lead to cruel suffering?
Hell No  
Buzzard64 : 7/13/2017 12:39 pm : link
They will just move their main staging area to wherever they locate a new den. Coyotes are highly adaptable. It will not be too long before Mavrics problem vanishes anyway. As soon as the little ones begin being trained to hunt they will disperse and no longer be hanging around the den...and his yard. But by destroying their den they should never return to where they had successfully birthed and raised a litter.
Hell No  
Buzzard64 : 7/13/2017 12:39 pm : link
They will just move their main staging area to wherever they locate a new den. Coyotes are highly adaptable. It will not be too long before Mavrics problem vanishes anyway. As soon as the little ones begin being trained to hunt they will disperse and no longer be hanging around the den...and his yard. But by destroying their den they should never return to where they had successfully birthed and raised a litter.
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