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NFT: Larry Rothschild coming back to Yanks per NYDN

Victor in CT : 11/14/2017 9:01 am
note to new manager: you have no power.

I like Larry though. Good to have him here to continue with Sevi, Montgomery et al.
Pitching coach Larry Rothschild to return to Yankees, may be only coach from Joe Girardiís staff to be retained Tweet email - ( New Window )
Good  
Dave in PA : 11/14/2017 9:02 am : link
Hard to argue with his success
I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
TheMick7 : 11/14/2017 9:05 am : link
we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!
...Connie Mack  
TheMick7 : 11/14/2017 9:05 am : link
.
RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
Beer Man : 11/14/2017 9:07 am : link
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:
Quote:
we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!
Make sense to sign him now. It may be a while before a Manager is found, and you don't want to risk losing a good pitching coach to another team in the meantime
Mack  
Dave in PA : 11/14/2017 9:08 am : link
Managed 7,755 major league games. That number is absurd
RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
BigBlueShock : 11/14/2017 9:12 am : link
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:
Quote:
we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!

First of all, they likely had to make a decision on Rothschild before he left for another job and they donít really have a manager yet, so...

Secondly, maybe itís just me and I could be way off here, but I donít remember a manager ever being responsible for bringing in ďhis own guysĒ. Thatís always been the GMs job as far as I know. They may get some feedback from the manager or let them sit in on interviews but the final decision is the GMs. GMs hire and managers manage. This isnít football.
RE: RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
mfsd : 11/14/2017 9:15 am : link
In comment 13691660 BigBlueShock said:
Quote:
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:


Quote:


we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!


First of all, they likely had to make a decision on Rothschild before he left for another job and they donít really have a manager yet, so...

Secondly, maybe itís just me and I could be way off here, but I donít remember a manager ever being responsible for bringing in ďhis own guysĒ. Thatís always been the GMs job as far as I know. They may get some feedback from the manager or let them sit in on interviews but the final decision is the GMs. GMs hire and managers manage. This isnít football.


I also canít imagine any candidate for manager having an issue with Larry already being here as pitching coach. By most accounts heís a respected veteran baseball guy whoís done a good job with the Yanks
Good article with video of Albert Abreu's final AFL start  
Heisenberg : 11/14/2017 9:31 am : link
He finished with 2.60 ERA in 6 starts. Arguably the highest ceiling of the Yanks' pitching prospects right now. Arrived in the McCann trade.
Link - ( New Window )
Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy  
JohnF : 11/14/2017 9:33 am : link
Was his full name. Per Wikipedia:

Quote:
Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy (December 22, 1862 Ė February 8, 1956), better known as Connie Mack, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. The longest-serving manager in Major League Baseball history, he holds records for wins (3,731), losses (3,948), and games managed (7,755), with his victory total being almost 1,000 more than any other manager.

Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics for the club's first 50 seasons of play, starting in 1901, before retiring at age 87 following the 1950 season, and was at least part-owner from 1901 to 1954.


Here's a picture of him managing:



Also, per Wikipedia, he has records that I think will never be broken...managed 50 years, and finished last 17 times!!!
Good news!  
EddieNYG : 11/14/2017 9:39 am : link
Rothschild is a good pitching coach, glad he is back.
RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
HomerJones45 : 11/14/2017 9:52 am : link
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:
Quote:
we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!
Interesting take and that is the trend. Stat nerds in the basement churning out statistics and putting binders (and no doubt iPads) together for the push-button manager. The manager simply checks the right chart for the situation and selects the indicated option. The position coaches who ensure the players are functioning to their statistical norms is more important.

The manager is really superfluous and actually could be eliminated. The Weasel already dictates what players play where and where they hit in the lineup. What's the difference if he is the one pushing the buttons during the game? He just needs a figurehead on the field.
RE: Good article with video of Albert Abreu's final AFL start  
Beer Man : 11/14/2017 9:58 am : link
In comment 13691681 Heisenberg said:
Quote:
He finished with 2.60 ERA in 6 starts. Arguably the highest ceiling of the Yanks' pitching prospects right now. Arrived in the McCann trade. Link - ( New Window )
He also needs to be added to the 53, as he is rule-5 eligible in December.
RE: RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
BigBlueShock : 11/14/2017 10:05 am : link
In comment 13691718 HomerJones45 said:
Quote:
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:


Quote:


we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!

Interesting take and that is the trend. Stat nerds in the basement churning out statistics and putting binders (and no doubt iPads) together for the push-button manager. The manager simply checks the right chart for the situation and selects the indicated option. The position coaches who ensure the players are functioning to their statistical norms is more important.

The manager is really superfluous and actually could be eliminated. The Weasel already dictates what players play where and where they hit in the lineup. What's the difference if he is the one pushing the buttons during the game? He just needs a figurehead on the field.

The Weasel? You really need to get laid man. Going through life as angry as you do must really suck.
RE: RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
rich in DC : 11/14/2017 10:11 am : link
In comment 13691718 HomerJones45 said:
Quote:
In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:


Quote:


we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!

Interesting take and that is the trend. Stat nerds in the basement churning out statistics and putting binders (and no doubt iPads) together for the push-button manager. The manager simply checks the right chart for the situation and selects the indicated option. The position coaches who ensure the players are functioning to their statistical norms is more important.

The manager is really superfluous and actually could be eliminated. The Weasel already dictates what players play where and where they hit in the lineup. What's the difference if he is the one pushing the buttons during the game? He just needs a figurehead on the field.


This is just factually wrong on so many counts, it is hard to know where to start.

For one, analytics are now a major part of the game- however, they do NOT replace decisions in the dugout. One fine example involved the Yanks themselves in the playoffs.

After Houston lost 3 straight in NY, the Astros assembled their scouts and analytics people to find out what went wrong. The answer was that the Astros pitchers were throwing too many fastballs- the Yanks hitters killed fastballs and struggled against breaking stuff. Thus, the Astros pitching coach and manager sat down with their pitchers, gave them the numbers and decided to emphasize the breaking ball in games 6 and 7- remember McCullers throwing knuckle curve after knuckle curve and the Yanks hitters being helpless?

Of course, FACTS don't fit into your uninformed rant, so this probably won't even compute to you.

One of Girardi's big failings was that he did not use the information given to him well- so he resorted to The Binder as a giant cheat sheet. While that allowed him to access information, a larger problem emerged- he was so reliant on The Binder that if information was not in the binder, the thought never entered his head.

Furthermore, Girardi could not simply pull up the data and apply it in real time- he was a reactive manager- he reacted to the situation instead of anticipating it. The Yanks want and need a proactive manager- someone who has a strong feel for the ebbs and flows of the game- and is able to compartmentalize the data given and use it strategically- namely- anticipate situations and be able to use the data to force the other team to react to the manager's moves.

Furthermore, iPads and other electronic devices are not allowed in the dugout- remember the Red Sox scandal with the iPhone watch? What the Yanks really want is someone who might have a couple pages of cheat sheets to reference during the game- but not be tethered to The Binder like Girardi.

The reason Cashman is spreading a net far and wide is that he wants to find a manager who has a solid personality- and can get along with people on more than a functional level. However, that person must also be in tune with the data the team will give him to prepare. In addition, the team wants the manager to have the in-game instincts that Girardi lacked- and be able to be proactive with the data- while still relying on the old-fashioned "gut feel."

A last reminder- during the World Series, there were several shots of Altuve looking in his hat before plays. It was later discovered that he had a chart in his hat that told him where to position himself defensively for each hitter. That is analytics. However, the manager must still be able to anticipate a bunt or a hit and run- and act accordingly. The data can't tell you when the other team will do that- that is just a gut feel or situational awareness.

Your rant is simply just another example of a fan who doesn't grasp why the Yanks fired Girardi. The Yanks had numerous reasons why- but chose the communications issue. It might have been wiser in retrospect to be a little more open about the other issues- but there really was no use kicking a guy when he was down. Just deal with the change to the game- the Astros just conclusively proved that talent alone doesn't win titles- a new aspect of the game is now who uses the data they have best to get an advantage. Don't belittle it- get better than the other guy at it.
I have no problem with the Yanks moving on from Girardi,  
shockeyisthebest8056 : 11/14/2017 10:37 am : link
but I would've liked to see that move made with a clear idea of who they wanted as a replacement. During this drawn out process, they seem to be considering everyone including the ghost of Jerome from Manhattan.
RE: I have no problem with the Yanks moving on from Girardi,  
Dave in PA : 11/14/2017 11:09 am : link
In comment 13691798 shockeyisthebest8056 said:
Quote:
but I would've liked to see that move made with a clear idea of who they wanted as a replacement. During this drawn out process, they seem to be considering everyone including the ghost of Jerome from Manhattan.
Was Jerome the guy who would call The Shmoozer and have an epileptic seizure of a rant after every single game? Keeping in mind that this was during one of the best runs in any sports franchise history lol. What a nut
RE: I have no problem with the Yanks moving on from Girardi,  
BigBlueShock : 11/14/2017 11:13 am : link
In comment 13691798 shockeyisthebest8056 said:
Quote:
but I would've liked to see that move made with a clear idea of who they wanted as a replacement. During this drawn out process, they seem to be considering everyone including the ghost of Jerome from Manhattan.

So you would rather them hire the first guy that comes along rather than do their due diligence and make sure they get the right guy? Weird take. They were clearly ready to move on from Joe and they can't go through the process until after the season so would you feel better if they strung Joe along this offseason until they had their guy?

How the heck could they have a clear idea of replacements before going through the process?
Due diligence is one thing  
Greg from LI : 11/14/2017 11:20 am : link
Trying to interview a hack like Bob Melvin is another.
RE: Due diligence is one thing  
BigBlueShock : 11/14/2017 11:49 am : link
In comment 13691860 Greg from LI said:
Quote:
Trying to interview a hack like Bob Melvin is another.

Yeah that was weird. No idea why they picked that guy out of the crowd. I have to assume there is some kind of connection but good lord, lol
RE: RE: I have no problem with the Yanks moving on from Girardi,  
shockeyisthebest8056 : 11/14/2017 12:20 pm : link
In comment 13691851 BigBlueShock said:
Quote:


So you would rather them hire the first guy that comes along rather than do their due diligence and make sure they get the right guy? Weird take. They were clearly ready to move on from Joe and they can't go through the process until after the season so would you feel better if they strung Joe along this offseason until they had their guy?

How the heck could they have a clear idea of replacements before going through the process?


Joe Girardi is a good manager. Unless they thought Girardi was completely inept at the job (which he clearly wasn't and I didn't particularly care for the guy), you don't toss him overboard without having a clear idea of "specific people" you'd like for the job. They seem to have this idea of the traits they want in a manager, but no specific targets. It's not about hiring "the first guy who comes along". In no part of my original comment did I advocate for that. If they were going to toss a good manager overboard, I'd like to see a more buttoned-up process here than everyone and their mother expressing interest, the Yankees not dismissing any of those interested, and interviewing bench coaches and retreads.

If they didn't have a clear idea of replacements BEFORE letting Girardi walk, then they're not doing their job properly.
Yeah, what the hell was that Bob Melvin bullshit?  
bceagle05 : 11/14/2017 12:24 pm : link
Trying to pry away a shitty manager employed by another team? If we're into that sort of thing, might as well ask Cleveland if we can interview Tito.
RE: RE: RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
HomerJones45 : 11/14/2017 12:52 pm : link
In comment 13691749 rich in DC said:
Quote:
In comment 13691718 HomerJones45 said:


Quote:


In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:


Quote:


we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!

Interesting take and that is the trend. Stat nerds in the basement churning out statistics and putting binders (and no doubt iPads) together for the push-button manager. The manager simply checks the right chart for the situation and selects the indicated option. The position coaches who ensure the players are functioning to their statistical norms is more important.

The manager is really superfluous and actually could be eliminated. The Weasel already dictates what players play where and where they hit in the lineup. What's the difference if he is the one pushing the buttons during the game? He just needs a figurehead on the field.



This is just factually wrong on so many counts, it is hard to know where to start.

For one, analytics are now a major part of the game- however, they do NOT replace decisions in the dugout. One fine example involved the Yanks themselves in the playoffs.

After Houston lost 3 straight in NY, the Astros assembled their scouts and analytics people to find out what went wrong. The answer was that the Astros pitchers were throwing too many fastballs- the Yanks hitters killed fastballs and struggled against breaking stuff. Thus, the Astros pitching coach and manager sat down with their pitchers, gave them the numbers and decided to emphasize the breaking ball in games 6 and 7- remember McCullers throwing knuckle curve after knuckle curve and the Yanks hitters being helpless?

Of course, FACTS don't fit into your uninformed rant, so this probably won't even compute to you.

One of Girardi's big failings was that he did not use the information given to him well- so he resorted to The Binder as a giant cheat sheet. While that allowed him to access information, a larger problem emerged- he was so reliant on The Binder that if information was not in the binder, the thought never entered his head.

Furthermore, Girardi could not simply pull up the data and apply it in real time- he was a reactive manager- he reacted to the situation instead of anticipating it. The Yanks want and need a proactive manager- someone who has a strong feel for the ebbs and flows of the game- and is able to compartmentalize the data given and use it strategically- namely- anticipate situations and be able to use the data to force the other team to react to the manager's moves.

Furthermore, iPads and other electronic devices are not allowed in the dugout- remember the Red Sox scandal with the iPhone watch? What the Yanks really want is someone who might have a couple pages of cheat sheets to reference during the game- but not be tethered to The Binder like Girardi.

The reason Cashman is spreading a net far and wide is that he wants to find a manager who has a solid personality- and can get along with people on more than a functional level. However, that person must also be in tune with the data the team will give him to prepare. In addition, the team wants the manager to have the in-game instincts that Girardi lacked- and be able to be proactive with the data- while still relying on the old-fashioned "gut feel."

A last reminder- during the World Series, there were several shots of Altuve looking in his hat before plays. It was later discovered that he had a chart in his hat that told him where to position himself defensively for each hitter. That is analytics. However, the manager must still be able to anticipate a bunt or a hit and run- and act accordingly. The data can't tell you when the other team will do that- that is just a gut feel or situational awareness.

Your rant is simply just another example of a fan who doesn't grasp why the Yanks fired Girardi. The Yanks had numerous reasons why- but chose the communications issue. It might have been wiser in retrospect to be a little more open about the other issues- but there really was no use kicking a guy when he was down. Just deal with the change to the game- the Astros just conclusively proved that talent alone doesn't win titles- a new aspect of the game is now who uses the data they have best to get an advantage. Don't belittle it- get better than the other guy at it.
The only rant is your own. I suppose I could have prefaced everything by saying "it seems" or "it appears" or "seems to be headed", but to the rational mind, it seemed clear enough that it was addressed to the gentleman who made the comment about going back to the Connie Mack era.

Thank you for proving my point about the future with your criticisms of Girardi.

And Ace, the Astros are quite talented. Their championship was only a surprise to those who underestimated them in the first place.

You may rant on.
RE: RE: RE: I have no problem w/Rothschild but  
Matt M. : 11/14/2017 4:03 pm : link
In comment 13691749 rich in DC said:
Quote:
In comment 13691718 HomerJones45 said:


Quote:


In comment 13691649 TheMick7 said:


Quote:


we now live in an era where the GM picks the manager's coaches.Considering they spend 8 months together,your manager should be able to bring in his own people. Otherwise,we can go back to the Connie mMck era & the GMs can manage in the dugouts in their business suits!

Interesting take and that is the trend. Stat nerds in the basement churning out statistics and putting binders (and no doubt iPads) together for the push-button manager. The manager simply checks the right chart for the situation and selects the indicated option. The position coaches who ensure the players are functioning to their statistical norms is more important.

The manager is really superfluous and actually could be eliminated. The Weasel already dictates what players play where and where they hit in the lineup. What's the difference if he is the one pushing the buttons during the game? He just needs a figurehead on the field.



This is just factually wrong on so many counts, it is hard to know where to start.

For one, analytics are now a major part of the game- however, they do NOT replace decisions in the dugout. One fine example involved the Yanks themselves in the playoffs.

After Houston lost 3 straight in NY, the Astros assembled their scouts and analytics people to find out what went wrong. The answer was that the Astros pitchers were throwing too many fastballs- the Yanks hitters killed fastballs and struggled against breaking stuff. Thus, the Astros pitching coach and manager sat down with their pitchers, gave them the numbers and decided to emphasize the breaking ball in games 6 and 7- remember McCullers throwing knuckle curve after knuckle curve and the Yanks hitters being helpless?

Of course, FACTS don't fit into your uninformed rant, so this probably won't even compute to you.

One of Girardi's big failings was that he did not use the information given to him well- so he resorted to The Binder as a giant cheat sheet. While that allowed him to access information, a larger problem emerged- he was so reliant on The Binder that if information was not in the binder, the thought never entered his head.

Furthermore, Girardi could not simply pull up the data and apply it in real time- he was a reactive manager- he reacted to the situation instead of anticipating it. The Yanks want and need a proactive manager- someone who has a strong feel for the ebbs and flows of the game- and is able to compartmentalize the data given and use it strategically- namely- anticipate situations and be able to use the data to force the other team to react to the manager's moves.

Furthermore, iPads and other electronic devices are not allowed in the dugout- remember the Red Sox scandal with the iPhone watch? What the Yanks really want is someone who might have a couple pages of cheat sheets to reference during the game- but not be tethered to The Binder like Girardi.

The reason Cashman is spreading a net far and wide is that he wants to find a manager who has a solid personality- and can get along with people on more than a functional level. However, that person must also be in tune with the data the team will give him to prepare. In addition, the team wants the manager to have the in-game instincts that Girardi lacked- and be able to be proactive with the data- while still relying on the old-fashioned "gut feel."

A last reminder- during the World Series, there were several shots of Altuve looking in his hat before plays. It was later discovered that he had a chart in his hat that told him where to position himself defensively for each hitter. That is analytics. However, the manager must still be able to anticipate a bunt or a hit and run- and act accordingly. The data can't tell you when the other team will do that- that is just a gut feel or situational awareness.

Your rant is simply just another example of a fan who doesn't grasp why the Yanks fired Girardi. The Yanks had numerous reasons why- but chose the communications issue. It might have been wiser in retrospect to be a little more open about the other issues- but there really was no use kicking a guy when he was down. Just deal with the change to the game- the Astros just conclusively proved that talent alone doesn't win titles- a new aspect of the game is now who uses the data they have best to get an advantage. Don't belittle it- get better than the other guy at it.
Actually, the data can tell you these things. If they do enough digging, they can get probabilities and tendencies in most scenarios.
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