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NFT: Kevin Lowe had panic attack during games-

SFGFNCGiantsFan : 3/6/2018 12:46 pm
Vs. Hawks on 11/5 & then again vs. OKC in late January, the latter being the one that set off that team meeting where people-Isaiah Thomas in particular-questioned Love's illness.

Anyways, as someone who has had panic attacks/anxiety issues, it's refreshing to see guys like Love & DeMar DeRozan open up about their battles with anxiety and depression. Mental health & the stigma surrounding it is ridiculous.

Anyways, it's worth a read.
Link - ( New Window )
Been going through this since 2007  
TommytheElephant : 3/6/2018 12:47 pm : link
Completely debilitating, and the struggle is real.
i have had the luck of only having 3 panic attacks  
GMAN4LIFE : 3/6/2018 12:50 pm : link
but i am always happy to know i am not the only one.
I've dealt with anxiety myself and have had panic attacks  
Bold Ruler : Mod : 3/6/2018 12:51 pm : link
It's one of the worst things I've ever dealt with.
Good for him  
Danny Kanell : 3/6/2018 12:57 pm : link
That was a good read. I had my first one at 29 also. It took a while to learn how to manage it but thankfully I did and had good support. Now at 40 itís a relatively distant memory but it always slightly sneaks up on me to remind me thatís its there. At least for me, it makes me appreciate life a bit more because the hell in the beginning before I learned how to cope and manage was unbearable.
I'm there myself  
vulcaninvt : 3/6/2018 12:59 pm : link
It's nice to see folks open a dialog about this. I've struggled with anxiety and depression since my mid 20's... I dealt with it for many, many years in unhealthy ways. I Finally started working with it in a more healthy manner, while not easy, it's something that with time and patience has and continues to get better.

Hopefully it continues to be a subject (mental illness) that is more openly talked about, especially for men.

Thanks everyone for opening up a bit!
crazy that he had one during a game or even during exercise  
djm : 3/6/2018 1:02 pm : link
i had one or two over the years--they always occurred during moments of non exertion.
I am just glad he was ok for the game  
figgy2989 : 3/6/2018 1:04 pm : link
On June 14, 1994
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arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 1:05 pm : link
It's a very real struggle and I feel terrible for anyone who suffers.

I had my first full-blown panic attack when I was 22. It turned my entire world upside-down for a long time. I had to walk away from a lot of opportunities and it was really crippling for several years.

I'm much better-equipped to handle it now and don't really get panic attacks anymore - but I do still struggle with anxiety from time to time.

It's even harder when the people around you have never experienced it and think it's something you just "suck up and deal with" - it's much more than that and it's much easier said than done.

I'm glad athletes are able to put this out there. It shouldn't be stigmatized or looked at as something "wrong" with someone.

No one who struggles with anxiety, depression or panic attacks should ever feel alone.
I had a doctor tell me years ago  
TommytheElephant : 3/6/2018 1:11 pm : link
Its an injury on the inside. Just like people who have broken limbs. There is no shame in hiding a broken limb, and you shouldn't feel weird to open up about anxiety/panic/depression.

I know plenty of people who seem like they need help, but I feel like they don't because they fear what others think.



It's happened to me as well.  
Mike from SI : 3/6/2018 1:11 pm : link
I have meds I take when it (rarely) happens. If someone questioned me about it I'd fight them straight up. It's a horrible thing to go through. You don't question people when they have cancer or a heart attack; it's weird that mental illness is treated differently and it really annoys me.
RE: It's happened to me as well.  
arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 1:16 pm : link
In comment 13852201 Mike from SI said:
Quote:
I have meds I take when it (rarely) happens. If someone questioned me about it I'd fight them straight up. It's a horrible thing to go through. You don't question people when they have cancer or a heart attack; it's weird that mental illness is treated differently and it really annoys me.


It just comes from a place of ignorance.

I try not to get angry at people who don't understand because they've never suffered with it.

When I was in my early/mid 20's, most of my friends and family had no idea what I was going through - so I always caught flak from them about it. They thought I was just exaggerating or making a big deal out of something I should have just "toughed out"

All of the important people in my life now have learned that isn't the case at all and know to just give me a little room to breathe if I'm having a tough day.

I don't struggle nearly as much now as I did back then - but I still have my days every now and then.
RE: It's happened to me as well.  
SFGFNCGiantsFan : 3/6/2018 1:21 pm : link
In comment 13852201 Mike from SI said:
Quote:
I have meds I take when it (rarely) happens. If someone questioned me about it I'd fight them straight up. It's a horrible thing to go through. You don't question people when they have cancer or a heart attack; it's weird that mental illness is treated differently and it really annoys me.


Mike, exactly. I hate the 'Well, it's just in your head' response. Just because it's not a physical injury doesn't mean it doesn't exist. It really just is ignorance.
RE: RE: It's happened to me as well.  
Mike from SI : 3/6/2018 1:21 pm : link
In comment 13852217 arcarsenal said:
Quote:
In comment 13852201 Mike from SI said:


Quote:


I have meds I take when it (rarely) happens. If someone questioned me about it I'd fight them straight up. It's a horrible thing to go through. You don't question people when they have cancer or a heart attack; it's weird that mental illness is treated differently and it really annoys me.



It just comes from a place of ignorance.

I try not to get angry at people who don't understand because they've never suffered with it.

When I was in my early/mid 20's, most of my friends and family had no idea what I was going through - so I always caught flak from them about it. They thought I was just exaggerating or making a big deal out of something I should have just "toughed out"

All of the important people in my life now have learned that isn't the case at all and know to just give me a little room to breathe if I'm having a tough day.

I don't struggle nearly as much now as I did back then - but I still have my days every now and then.


Good points. I'm glad you're (seemingly) doing better. The skepticism is just very frustrating sometimes.
virtually everyone close to me  
UESBLUE : 3/6/2018 1:22 pm : link
(and they happen to all be women) suffer from depression anxiety and panic attacks.
and ill add  
UESBLUE : 3/6/2018 1:24 pm : link
the efficacy rate in treatment and recovery is at its highest when a combo of cognitive behavior therapy and the correct medication are used.
RE: RE: RE: It's happened to me as well.  
arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 1:26 pm : link
In comment 13852233 Mike from SI said:
Quote:
In comment 13852217 arcarsenal said:


Quote:


In comment 13852201 Mike from SI said:


Quote:


I have meds I take when it (rarely) happens. If someone questioned me about it I'd fight them straight up. It's a horrible thing to go through. You don't question people when they have cancer or a heart attack; it's weird that mental illness is treated differently and it really annoys me.



It just comes from a place of ignorance.

I try not to get angry at people who don't understand because they've never suffered with it.

When I was in my early/mid 20's, most of my friends and family had no idea what I was going through - so I always caught flak from them about it. They thought I was just exaggerating or making a big deal out of something I should have just "toughed out"

All of the important people in my life now have learned that isn't the case at all and know to just give me a little room to breathe if I'm having a tough day.

I don't struggle nearly as much now as I did back then - but I still have my days every now and then.



Good points. I'm glad you're (seemingly) doing better. The skepticism is just very frustrating sometimes.


No doubt about it - it's very frustrating. I know where you're coming from.
I have the issue  
moespree : 3/6/2018 1:32 pm : link
There are time periods where everything is fine and I'm full of energy and enthusiasm. And then out of the blue an anxiety attack happens and I struggle to even step outside and need a few days to a week to compose myself again.

It's strange because this was not an issue at all until my teen years. It just randomly started one day as a teenager, with nothing that I can ever think of as a trigger for it, and has been with me ever since.
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Jints in Carolina : 3/6/2018 1:34 pm : link
Iíve been dealing with anxiety and panic attacks off and on since 1999. This is a real thing. And it is debilitating. Iíve been on meds since then and it has somewhat controlled it. But like another poster said, itís always there to remind you.
It may be like a broken bone but...  
Alan in Toledo : 3/6/2018 1:41 pm : link
it takes courage to admit anything resembling a personal weakness.

I'm surprised at the number of affected posters. Well done!
RE: I have the issue  
arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 1:41 pm : link
In comment 13852262 moespree said:
Quote:
There are time periods where everything is fine and I'm full of energy and enthusiasm. And then out of the blue an anxiety attack happens and I struggle to even step outside and need a few days to a week to compose myself again.

It's strange because this was not an issue at all until my teen years. It just randomly started one day as a teenager, with nothing that I can ever think of as a trigger for it, and has been with me ever since.


Unfortunately, that's kind of just how it goes.

I had no issues with panic or anxiety at all when I was in high school. I didn't even have any issues with it for most of my college years

It happened to me out of the blue in my senior year of college, actually.

I was waiting for a professor in the hallway with other people in the class and I got this weird twinge of "something isn't right..."

I brushed it off at first - just took a walk around the halls, went to a water fountain. Didn't think much of it.

Got back, the prof. was there so I went in and sat in my seat and then I started getting a full blown attack. I couldn't see straight, I was lightheaded, sweating, heart racing. I had no idea what was wrong with me and I just walked out of the classroom.

Tried to just drive home and call it a day and it got even worse on the parkway.

One of the worst days and scariest experiences of my life because that day, I had no idea what was wrong with me. I thought I was really having a heart attack or something awful was happening to me.

Didn't get much easier even knowing what it was down the road - but that one day changed my life for a long time after. I had some really crippling episodes in my 20's.
Thought this was a really late revelation  
Mad Mike : 3/6/2018 1:55 pm : link
from former Oiler and Ranger Kevin Lowe. Seemed pretty out of nowhere.

Anyway, best wishes to Love, that's tough to go through.
My dad in a couple of weeks will be gone for 17 years  
The 12th Man : 3/6/2018 1:57 pm : link
the last 10 years he suffered tremendously with panic attacks and anxiety. He passed away too young at 61 and I really believe the panic attacks and anxiety had something to do with it. He and the doctors were able to get them under control the last year and half before he passed. It was a wonderful thing to see the man I grew up with for the last 1 year and half he was back to himself. I feel for anyone who has gone through them, they are very real and very much debilitating.
RE: Thought this was a really late revelation  
SFGFNCGiantsFan : 3/6/2018 2:02 pm : link
In comment 13852293 Mad Mike said:
Quote:
from former Oiler and Ranger Kevin Lowe. Seemed pretty out of nowhere.

Anyway, best wishes to Love, that's tough to go through.


Haha. Jesus. I just realized I spelled Lowe, not Love. My bad obviously.
_________  
I am Ninja : 3/6/2018 2:20 pm : link
I had one spurt in law school (not even 1st year) for about 4 months where I would get them for no apparent external reason. soon the fear of it coming on would bring it on. craziest thing. pcp gave me xanax, which after not long i didnt need, just knowing i had it if i needed it was enough to get me thru til it passed.

im no armchair neuroscientist or whatever, but i really feel like it was either a product of, or itself caused a real change inside my noggin. Before that period id get anxious like everybody else... typical stuff, speaking in front of large groups, new experiences... now, never ever.

I sympathize w people who cant shake free of it.
RE: Good for him  
PhiPsi125 : 3/6/2018 3:14 pm : link
In comment 13852175 Danny Kanell said:
Quote:
That was a good read. I had my first one at 29 also. It took a while to learn how to manage it but thankfully I did and had good support. Now at 40 itís a relatively distant memory but it always slightly sneaks up on me to remind me thatís its there. At least for me, it makes me appreciate life a bit more because the hell in the beginning before I learned how to cope and manage was unbearable.


Very similar to my experience and how I deal with it. Anxiety took over my life for more than a year. I felt like a stranger in my own body. And not knowing/understanding why it was happening wrecked havoc on the condition itself. What ultimately brought me out of it was talking to people and time. It took time to get in that condition...it was going to take time to get out of it. I talked to so many people and to hear that you arenít actually crazy was comforting lol.

Silly little acronyms like FEAR (false evidence appearing real) helped to put things in perspective. Panic attacks suck. Literally thought I was having a heart attack one night. My mom raced over to the house to shove aspirin down my throat. But people helped me and I urge anyone that will listen, to talk and communicate with people. It helps. A lot.

Then one day, I just felt normal. Like a completely different person. The way I look back on it is like an out of body experience. Itís fascinating how the mind/body works. Also complicated. But as DK mentioned, I get little twinges every once in a while as a reminder.
They are awful  
Ned In Atlanta : 3/6/2018 3:19 pm : link
I had it bad for a period of about 8 months in 2015. Couldnít sleep and constantly felt awful. Iím so lucky that meds and time seems to have cured them for me (fingers crossed). They are real and they SUCK
I've also had them in the past and they  
tangled up in blue : 3/6/2018 5:57 pm : link
will change your life. I got some short term cognitive-behavioral therapy and continued to apply what I learned over the next couple of years. I turned a corner when I tried to deliberately enter "feared" situations and initiate an attack and nothing happened.

My heart goes out to anyone dealing with anxiety issues.

It's wonderful to have open dialogue about mental health issues. When I told people about what I was going through, I was amazed by how many people opened up about their own issues.
RE: I've also had them in the past and they  
BocaGiants91 : 3/6/2018 6:56 pm : link
In comment 13852581 tangled up in blue said:
Quote:
will change your life. I got some short term cognitive-behavioral therapy and continued to apply what I learned over the next couple of years. I turned a corner when I tried to deliberately enter "feared" situations and initiate an attack and nothing happened.

My heart goes out to anyone dealing with anxiety issues.

It's wonderful to have open dialogue about mental health issues. When I told people about what I was going through, I was amazed by how many people opened up about their own issues.


Iíve been dealing with it for awhile , my first panic attack was 2003, it took me till about 2006 to really get it under control , although some of it was my doctor diagnosing me with something I didnít have and giving me the wrong medication that made it worse. Itís been better, depression always a little there but not serious, panic attacks scary for me but since I had em I kind know when itís coming. I didnít have one for a few years then I had one 3 weeks ago, and it was bad but I dealt with it and rode it out then felt better.
SFGF, that was a great article  
Moondawg : 3/6/2018 8:32 pm : link
thanks so much.
Not being snarky and not questioning anyone  
10thAve : 3/6/2018 8:46 pm : link
But what is the actual experience when you have a panic attack? Iíve never had one (that I know of anyway) nor do I get too anxious about things. Do they all mirror what Love experienced in the article?
RE: Not being snarky and not questioning anyone  
arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 8:59 pm : link
In comment 13852709 10thAve said:
Quote:
But what is the actual experience when you have a panic attack? Iíve never had one (that I know of anyway) nor do I get too anxious about things. Do they all mirror what Love experienced in the article?


The easiest way for me to explain it is - imagine yourself out in the woods alone and you turn a corner to see a Lion there.

Think about how you'd react. You'd probably freeze up in fear, feel panicked, your heart would start racing, you'd start to feel a little dizzy. Your body would be prepping you for fight or flight mode knowing that there is real danger in front of you.

Except, when it's anxiety, you feel that same exact way - but there's no danger in front of you. So you feel bewildered and worried. You feel short of breath, disoriented, your palms sweat, your heart feels like it is beating out of your chest, and nothing around you feels real - but there's nothing dangerous there.

And so, you fuel the fire with more fire. Then you become fearful of your symptoms thinking they're serious or that you're going to collapse or pass out. The more you think this, the worse it gets. Like a vicious cycle.

Sitting here right now, I realize how easy it seems to just say "I've been through this before, it's nothing" and shrug it off - and that's sort of the basis behind recovery. But I can assure you that it is NOT easy and that it takes a lot of time and practice.

Even when you know it's anxiety/panic, it can still be monumentally difficult to deal with and a serious struggle.
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arcarsenal : 3/6/2018 9:12 pm : link
As a matter of fact, I think Love does a great job of describing it himself...

Quote:
After halftime, it all hit the fan. Coach Lue called a timeout in the third quarter. When I got to the bench, I felt my heart racing faster than usual. Then I was having trouble catching my breath. Itís hard to describe, but everything was spinning, like my brain was trying to climb out of my head. The air felt thick and heavy. My mouth was like chalk. I remember our assistant coach yelling something about a defensive set. I nodded, but I didnít hear much of what he said. By that point, I was freaking out. When I got up to walk out of the huddle, I knew I couldnít reenter the game ó like, literally couldnít do it physically.
RE: .  
Danny Kanell : 3/6/2018 9:37 pm : link
In comment 13852730 arcarsenal said:
Quote:
As a matter of fact, I think Love does a great job of describing it himself...



Quote:


After halftime, it all hit the fan. Coach Lue called a timeout in the third quarter. When I got to the bench, I felt my heart racing faster than usual. Then I was having trouble catching my breath. Itís hard to describe, but everything was spinning, like my brain was trying to climb out of my head. The air felt thick and heavy. My mouth was like chalk. I remember our assistant coach yelling something about a defensive set. I nodded, but I didnít hear much of what he said. By that point, I was freaking out. When I got up to walk out of the huddle, I knew I couldnít reenter the game ó like, literally couldnít do it physically.



This and your post above it sum up the experience of it very well.
...  
christian : 3/6/2018 10:12 pm : link
Arc -- perfect description.

The brain is having all the same chemical reactions as a fight or flight scenario, but there is nothing to fight or flee from -- which then never triggers the calming response the brain sends when danger is over.

I've described the Lion scenario to anyone who's ever asked about my chronic anxiety. It's a great description.
RE: ...  
BocaGiants91 : 3/7/2018 12:14 am : link
In comment 13852775 christian said:
Quote:
Arc -- perfect description.

The brain is having all the same chemical reactions as a fight or flight scenario, but there is nothing to fight or flee from -- which then never triggers the calming response the brain sends when danger is over.

I've described the Lion scenario to anyone who's ever asked about my chronic anxiety. It's a great description.


Yes Arc itís good description. I would add that after I have one , the fear of another one can be bad. I also will will avoid stuff I did the day I had one. For instance I had Speghetti and meatballs for dinner the night I had one three weeks ago and I just canít eat that right now thinking about it.

The panic attack caused lots of pacing would not let me sit down for awhile. It just feels like your ready to jump out at something and the heart racing is scariest part. I havenít been in therapy for a few years, but this last episode is making me consider going back to a therapist. I keep things bottled up too much
I had a panic attack in law school  
Hammer : 3/7/2018 2:45 pm : link
I thought I was going to die. It was one of the worst experiences that I've had in my life. I couldn't catch my breath and I thought my heart was going to jump out of my throat.

Blech.
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