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NFT: Your Signature Dish & Recipe

BleedingBlue2 : 1/3/2019 5:59 pm
Food threads on BBI always result in some good recipes, so let's hear it... what is your signature dish? if you would like to share, the recipe as well.

And yes, I am sure some of you make a mean SpaghettiOs...
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I wish I could master  
Beezer : 1/4/2019 11:01 am : link
Asian dishes, but no matter what I try - including shopping at Asian food markets, talking up the very patient folks there, trial and error and getting semi-close for a white guy - I just have not been able to hit on any of the attempts, just right. I'm relegated to order takeout when I have a real hankering. Dammit.
I did nail it with a really great  
Beezer : 1/4/2019 11:03 am : link
Cubano recipe last spring. Woke up one day thinking, I need to make Cubanos tonight. Researched it, made a couple small adjustments (as always), and it worked out really well.

Definitely a "baseball season dinner."
RE: buffalo chicken pasta in crockpot  
SicilianGMEN : 1/4/2019 11:06 am : link
In comment 14246562 CGiants07 said:
Quote:
2lb cut up chicken, put in crockpot salt and pepper
cream of chicken soup
1/2 cup hot sauce or more depending on how spicy you want it

cook on low for 4-6 hours
add 2 tablespoons of sour cream
8 of shredded mozzarella
1 table spoon of ranch dressing and blue cheese.
stir then turn off crockpot

cook past in boiling water for 8-10 mins, drain and mix the misure and pasta


Sounds great but what kind of chicken? Chicken breast? Shredded (like from a rotisserie)? Thx
RE: I have a handful of things my wife and kids ask me to make,  
BleedingBlue2 : 1/4/2019 11:06 am : link
In comment 14247120 Beezer said:
Quote:
so I guess that qualifies as "signature."

* My (hot Italian) sausage lasagna
* My very spicy chili (unless you're not an "extremely hot food" person, do not attempt). Very tasty, also made with hot Italian sausage, but dangerous.
* My bacon/corn chowder (ever year as a Thanksgiving side - folks request that we deliver containers to their homes, true story)
* My potato/leak soup - a new one I just attempted a few months ago. Found a recipe in a magazine, then (of course) doctored it to personal tastes in the family. About time to give it a second go.
* And of course, my chicken parm, which on Day 2 leads to chicken parm subs, is somewhat legendary. :)


Bacon/corn chowder seems right up my families alley. Care to share the recipe?!
Fire-roasted Corn Salsa  
bigbluehoya : 1/4/2019 11:18 am : link
- Roast corn directly on gas burners (or do it on the grill, I prefer to do inside as my grill is natgas and I don't get much of a flame to really put some char on the corn)
- Finely chop a red onion (I find about 1 onion for every 4-5 ears of corn is a decent ratio)
- chopped cilantro (optional)

Combine corn / red onion / cilantro.

~ 2 tbsp olive oil
~ 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
~ a few generous pinches of kosher salt
~ grind in some freshly ground black pepper
~ a few small shakes of ground cumin
~a few healthy shakes of ground chipotle powder (adjust to preference, this can add a lot of kick quickly)

Mix it all up and ideally let it sit in the refrigerator for an hour or two (the sitting time really makes a difference).

Adjust as you see fit. Some people like black beans in there, but my wife LOVES this salsa and HATES beans.

Open up a bag of your favorite tortilla chips and watch it all disappear.

It's super basic, but people rave about this whenever I make it.

I forgot to include a step  
bigbluehoya : 1/4/2019 11:20 am : link
to cut the corn off the cob. But if you need to be told that, you should probably just stay out of the kitchen, and that's OK.
I'll give you some general parameters, but my "recipe"  
Beezer : 1/4/2019 11:25 am : link
is really from the hip. I saw a recipe years ago in a magazine or online (can't remember now), and I altered things to taste.

Here's what goes in. I make a large pot and have at LEAST 4-5 decent sized Tupperware containers to deliver to friends/neighbors. So you can scale as you like.

* 3-5 pounds of bacon (I cut it into half-inch pieces, fry that all up, then drain the grease).
* A 5-pound bag(ish) of potatoes (I clean them and chop them, bite size, skin and all)
* A pound and sometimes more chopped carrots.
* I throw in about 3-4 canned corn (regular, no jewels), then I will add a couple cans of cream corn to get a little texture going.
* I could chop a clove or two of garlic but I'm usually lazy so I'll get a good-sized jar or minced garlic, drain the fluid, and dump her in.
* I get chicken broth - usually buy 4-5 containers (the plastic ... Swanson is one brand I recall).
* I'll put maybe 1-2 cups of milk in with the broth.
* Whatever seasonings to have/like ... we use Goya like we own stock.

I will usually put all the solid ingredients in the pot (no heat going yet), and see where I am with volume, then start to add the chicken brother. If I buy 5 containers, I find I will usually have at least 1 extra to put in the pantry for later use.

Once the fluid if in, I get the heat going. I heat it quickly, then turn it way down. Give yourself a couple inches of leeway at the top because like with any soups, if you happen to walk away and someone comes along (ahem, Mrs. Beez, one example) and thinks it needs to be turned up a bit, you could end up cleaning the stove top. lol

I usually let the "soup" simmer on a low heat for 3-4 hours. Be sure to stir pretty often.

Hope that helps!
Recipe for BleedingBlue.  
Beezer : 1/4/2019 11:26 am : link
:)
RE: Cereal.  
Vanzetti : 1/4/2019 11:31 am : link
In comment 14246611 fivehead said:
Quote:
Start with a bowl of cereal, add milk.


How much milk?
Sunday Gravy and Balls...  
x meadowlander : 1/4/2019 12:03 pm : link
Sauce/Gravy/Whatever:
- 2 oz Veg Oil
- 1 Lb bone-in country style pork ribs
- 1 can tomato paste
- 3 fat cloves garlic, crushed
- 4 28oz cans Wegman's Organic crushed tomatoes
- at least 28 oz beef broth

Big pot. High heat, get oil going, brown ribs on both sides.
Remove ribs from pan, cut heat to low, give it a couple of minutes to cool so the garlic doesn't burn.
Garlic goes in for about 30 seconds.
Add tomato paste, deglaze bottom of pot with it, scraping the bits off the bottom. Work quick so garlic doesn't burn.
Tomatoes go in, all of em.
Add 28 oz beef broth, put the ribs back in.
Bring to a boil, lower heat and let it cook at LEAST 8 hours. If it gets overly thick, add more broth.
After an hour or so, begin seasoning to taste. I prefer to keep it simple, salt, pepper, oregano. Long sauce with all that pork and eventually meatballs will have plenty of flavor.

MEATBALLS:
- 4 slices white sandwich bread (no crusts)
- 1 cup buttermilk
- 2 lbs ground beef/pork/turkey (I prefer all beef)
- 1/2 cup GOOD parmesan cheese
- 3 tablespoons minced FRESH parsley
- 2 large egg yolks
- 2 small cloves garlic
- 1 teaspoon salt
- 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
- Vegetable oil
- Red Wine

Pour fat glass of red wine. Start drinkin'. :)
Use a food processor to make bread crumbs from the bread slices (no crusts).
In a large bowl, or better yet - Kitchen Aid Mixer bowl - add bread crumbs.
Add buttermilk to bowl, stir. After 5 minutes, bread crumbs have fully absorbed buttermilk.
Add egg yolks, parmesan, chopped parsley to bowl. Add meat, salt, pepper.
Roast ONE of the garlic cloves - in a frying pan, skin on for a few minutes.
Mince both the fresh and roasted clove - both go into the bowl.
If you have the Kitchen Aid, fire it up. Easy peasy. If not, wash your hands and go to town mixing it all well.
1/2 cup of meatball mixture per ball. Wet measuring cup works great. Shape each ball, put em on a large platter or pan, refrigerate for at least a half hour so they hold their shape better when you fry them.
Add 1/4" of vegetable oil to a cast iron pan. (Cast iron has mojo) Medium-High heat. Fry in smaller batches, no more than 8 or 9 per or you wind up with too much liquid, boiled balls instead of fried. I use 2 wooden spoons to turn. If there IS too much liquid, drain it, add and heat more oil and continue with the next batch.
When all balls are cooked, deglaze the pan with about a 1/4 cup of the red wine. Scrape browned bits.
IF what is now in that pan looks and smells delicious, add to the pot of sauce. If instead, it looks and smells like black, cigarette ash carbon, throw it out.

When there's about an hour til' dinner, put the balls and any other meats you want (cooked sausage, pepperoni, pork chops) into the sauce. Flavors both meat and sauce.

Fresh pasta is better.

And make sure you've got a loaf or two of killer Italian Bread.

Enjoy.
RE: I have a handful of things my wife and kids ask me to make,  
Del Shofner : 1/4/2019 12:05 pm : link
In comment 14247120 Beezer said:
Quote:
My potato/leak soup


Trying not to picture the "leak" part...
RE: Recipe for BleedingBlue.  
BleedingBlue2 : 1/4/2019 12:28 pm : link
In comment 14247180 Beezer said:
Quote:
:)


Thank you!
RE: RE: I have a handful of things my wife and kids ask me to make,  
Beezer : 1/4/2019 12:29 pm : link
In comment 14247239 Del Shofner said:
Quote:
In comment 14247120 Beezer said:


Quote:


My potato/leak soup



Trying not to picture the "leak" part...


Ha.

Leek.
Potato Leak Soup  
bigbluehoya : 1/4/2019 12:31 pm : link
"This soup tastes like shit."

"Nope, but you're close..."
This thread needs more pictures!  
CaLLaHaN : 1/4/2019 12:34 pm : link
All these recipes sound delicious!
Thanks Lou  
CRinCA : 1/4/2019 12:41 pm : link
Here iin Northern CA I'm fortunate to have a few options. Appreciate the suggestions.
X meadowlander won  
idiotsavant : 1/4/2019 1:00 pm : link
Holy Crap gotta try that recipe.

Here's mine r now:

Cold Granny Smith apples. Hot bacon straight from pan.

Slice, top, eat.
Zeps  
jintsjunkie : 1/4/2019 1:58 pm : link
If you've ever been to a real Italian street fair (festa), you know about Zeppole. It's not unlike funnel cakes or fried dough, but the flavor is much more layered and complex. Best to have a deep fat fryer at the ready, but you can do it in a sauce pot about halfway filled with canola oil and monitored with a fry thermometer. Here ya go:


1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup ricotta
1/2 cup mascarpone
3 tbs sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1-2 tsp vanilla extract (to taste)
1/2 tsp salt
1 egg, beaten
2 oz. cold water
Confectioners sugar and cinnamon for dusting

Preheat to 300 degrees F an ample amount of cooking oil in a deep fryer or large pan.
In a separate saucepan combine and mix all ingredients (except confectioners sugar and cinnamon) while warming on stove, constantly mixing until smooth.
Use teaspoon to form balls of dough, then drop into oil at 300 degrees F. (Zeps will flip when one side is done; shake basket or poke with a spoon to ensure.)
When done, drain on paper towels then transfer to a
bowl and sift confectioners sugar and cinnamon over top. (You could also place the zeppole in a paper bag, add the sugar and cinnamon and shake.)
Serve warm.
My..  
FatMan in Charlotte : 1/4/2019 1:59 pm : link
Grandmother made the best pizza fritta, which is a lot like zeppole.
my duck breast with pan roasted taters and green's  
gidiefor : Mod : 1/4/2019 2:18 pm : link
in Mrs gidiefor's opinion -- will post recipe tomorrow evening
RE: X meadowlander won  
Bill L : 1/4/2019 2:49 pm : link
In comment 14247335 idiotsavant said:
Quote:
Holy Crap gotta try that recipe.

Here's mine r now:

Cold Granny Smith apples. Hot bacon straight from pan.

Slice, top, eat.

Now that margi's back posting, he should put his sauce recipe back up. Two to choose from.
RE: RE: RE: Not  
Bill in UT : 1/4/2019 2:50 pm : link
In comment 14247078 smshmth8690 said:
Quote:
In comment 14247062 Bill in UT said:


Quote:


In comment 14246785 Pork Chop said:


Quote:


but I made a Timpano last week. I have been wanting to do this for 20+ years, since I saw The Big Night.

Complicated and time consuming, but fun and delicious.





I did the same last year after watching the movie. Wasn't worth it. I'd rather just make a baked ziti with meat.



Timpano, that is one hell of an undertaking, more like a signature construction site, instead of a recipe. BTW PorkChop - great job! It looks fantastic.

Just an aside, the movie 'The Big Night' was filmed in my hometown, the exterior shots anyway. I remember watching the scenes from outside the brothers restaurant being filmed.


They should have hired you as chef. The movie would have had a much better ending
RE: I have no desire..  
Bill in UT : 1/4/2019 2:57 pm : link
In comment 14247114 FatMan in Charlotte said:
Quote:
to do a Timpano - but it is more out of the philosophy I have towards cooking. I like to cook to create something new - not necessarily to follow a recipe or a construction. I like eating at those who do as they put the work in and I get to enjoy!!

Everytime I've done a dish with a lot of prep or things that have to be painstakingly monitored, I've failed. And I know why - I have no desire to make caramel or an architectural work.

I draw the line at spatchcocking and making my own bracciole.

A good kitchen shears is worth its weight in gold and bracciole only takes rolling up meat and twining it.


I really admire you and Drew and anyone who can really be creative in the kitchen. Maybe I could do a little of that now that I've got a lot of experience cooking- I'm sure I know more than I give myself credit for. My most useful ability has been in selecting good recipes from great chefs and putting in the effort needed to recreate them and maybe just tinker with them a little on my own. If the world's star chefs are willing to share with me, who am I to say no thanks :)
Here's one I invented but haven't had chance to make yet  
idiotsavant : 1/4/2019 2:58 pm : link
Gnocci with Chicharron and Shrimp.

Cut the Chicharron and Shrimp to match the gnocci shape semi-exactly (maybe allow for shrinkage on Chicharron).

Render and crisp Chicharron in a good large heavy pan with plenty space between (maybe start w olive oil). Remove leaving fat.

Start gnocci cooking while you cook raw fresh shrimp in the Chicharron fat. Do not crowd pan.

Mix and saute briefly all together and garnish with a green item.

Have fun eating (which is which?)
It's kind of a play on texture  
idiotsavant : 1/4/2019 3:03 pm : link
But with variation on salt and sweet as well.

One thing about gnocci is it takes practice to get it toothy. Totally different method than pasta.
Hah -- I got to it sooner than I thought I would  
gidiefor : Mod : 1/4/2019 5:10 pm : link
Okay first of all – if you want to cook an amazing duck breast – that means you want to cook it with the skin on – and the secret to cooking it is to cook the skin first as if it were bacon

I use thawed D’Artagnan duck breasts – in my younger days I would eat a whole one – now me and Mrs gidiefor share a whole one. They are the best buy and most consistent quality I have been able to find in Duck Breasts.

Peel 6 medium size yellow meat potatoes (Yukons are good) and quarter and throw into pot with lightly salted water. Bring to a boil over high flame, lower flame and cook for about 10 minutes. While potatoes are cooking, Chop up and saute about ˝ pound of shitake or A grade wild mushrooms until cooked through and browned – but not burned – Lou prefers butter – I use EVO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil) over a medium low flame, (and I add rendered duck fat later in recipe.) Set aside on a serving plate. Drain potatoes, running under cold water and when cool enough to handle, drain and shake off excess water. Slice potatoes about 1/4-1/2“ thick and throw in mushroom pan with a little coarse salt, cook until potatoes start brown, shaking pan and flipping occasionally.

Turn on oven to 425 degrees and let warm up. Remove duck breast from refrigerator and then from package after thawing (I buy them pre-thawed, but mostly they come frozen and can be mail ordered). Thoroughly pat dry both sides of breast with paper towel. Lay skin side up on clean cutting board and using sharp chef’s knife, score skin first angled in one direction across width in 1/2” strip piercing skin to just expose breast meat, then angle in opposite direction and rescore going the other way (making a criss cross pattern). Sprinkle coarse salt, ground black pepper or ground grains of paradise and fennel pollen generously making sure grains fall into and help define scoring. Flip over and trim any excess fat or skin to make a uniform fillet, remove any obvious blemishes and/or obvious silver skin. Lightly sprinkle some more coarse salt, ground grains of paradise and fennel pollen on meat side. Lay skin side down in cast iron pan (do not place any fat or pre heat pan). Turn on flame to medium and cook skin side for 8 minutes or until skin is uniformly deep brown in color. Carefully pour off rendered fat, or spoon it by tilting pan into potatoes and throw mushroom in with the potatoes and mix it all together lowering flame to low setting.

Turn over breast and cook for 1 1/2 minutes searing top then turning and searing along skin edge all around with tongs. Drain off any additional renderings into potatoes, place resting on skin side in pan and place in oven at 425 degrees.

In another saute pan heat up and add EVO (I use Fairway EVO) over medium flame. Throw in a pinch of coarse slat and a half teaspoon of red pepper flakes – prepare your favorite greens in a saute – do no over cook – we prefer broccoli rape cut in 1 to 2 “ pieces.

Check duck after 8 minutes for internal temp of 130 - 135 degrees – if it needs more cooking check at 3 or 4 minute intervals after first 8 minutes. When internal temp goes above 130 – remove from oven and place on a carving board and let it rest for a few minutes. (tip Carving board should have channels to catch drippings or you will make a mess).

Plate potatoes and then greens making sure to drain before placing on plate and keep next to each other but separate.

Carve duck breast at an angle width wise in 1/8 to 1/4 “ slices and arrange on potatoes so they can catch drippings.

Serve immediately!!!!


RE: Hah -- I got to it sooner than I thought I would  
Bill in UT : 1/4/2019 6:26 pm : link
In comment 14247693 gidiefor said:
Quote:
Okay first of all – if you want to cook an amazing duck breast – that means you want to cook it with the skin on – and the secret to cooking it is to cook the skin first as if it were bacon

I use thawed D’Artagnan duck breasts – in my younger days I would eat a whole one – now me and Mrs gidiefor share a whole one. They are the best buy and most consistent quality I have been able to find in Duck Breasts.
Peel 6 medium size yellow meat potatoes (Yukons are good) and quarter and throw into pot with lightly salted water. Bring to a boil over high flame, lower flame and cook for about 10 minutes. While potatoes are cooking, Chop up and saute about ˝ pound of shitake or A grade wild mushrooms until cooked through and browned – but not burned – Lou prefers butter – I use EVO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil) over a medium low flame, (and I add rendered duck fat later in recipe.) Set aside on a serving plate. Drain potatoes, running under cold water and when cool enough to handle, drain and shake off excess water. Slice potatoes about 1/4-1/2“ thick and throw in mushroom pan with a little coarse salt, cook until potatoes start brown, shaking pan and flipping occasionally.

Turn on oven to 425 degrees and let warm up. Remove duck breast from refrigerator and then from package after thawing (I buy them pre-thawed, but mostly they come frozen and can be mail ordered). Thoroughly pat dry both sides of breast with paper towel. Lay skin side up on clean cutting board and using sharp chef’s knife, score skin first angled in one direction across width in 1/2” strip piercing skin to just expose breast meat, then angle in opposite direction and rescore going the other way (making a criss cross pattern). Sprinkle coarse salt, ground black pepper or ground grains of paradise and fennel pollen generously making sure grains fall into and help define scoring. Flip over and trim any excess fat or skin to make a uniform fillet, remove any obvious blemishes and/or obvious silver skin. Lightly sprinkle some more coarse salt, ground grains of paradise and fennel pollen on meat side. Lay skin side down in cast iron pan (do not place any fat or pre heat pan). Turn on flame to medium and cook skin side for 8 minutes or until skin is uniformly deep brown in color. Carefully pour off rendered fat, or spoon it by tilting pan into potatoes and throw mushroom in with the potatoes and mix it all together lowering flame to low setting.

Turn over breast and cook for 1 1/2 minutes searing top then turning and searing along skin edge all around with tongs. Drain off any additional renderings into potatoes, place resting on skin side in pan and place in oven at 425 degrees.

In another saute pan heat up and add EVO (I use Fairway EVO) over medium flame. Throw in a pinch of coarse slat and a half teaspoon of red pepper flakes – prepare your favorite greens in a saute – do no over cook – we prefer broccoli rape cut in 1 to 2 “ pieces.

Check duck after 8 minutes for internal temp of 130 - 135 degrees – if it needs more cooking check at 3 or 4 minute intervals after first 8 minutes. When internal temp goes above 130 – remove from oven and place on a carving board and let it rest for a few minutes. (tip Carving board should have channels to catch drippings or you will make a mess).

Plate potatoes and then greens making sure to drain before placing on plate and keep next to each other but separate.

Carve duck breast at an angle width wise in 1/8 to 1/4 “ slices and arrange on potatoes so they can catch drippings.

Serve immediately!!!!



Gidie, I'm sure this is delicious as described. My thought on reading it is that duck breast, skin aside, is not a fatty piece of meat and would do great cooking with sous vide and searing after.
RE: BlueLou - looks great!  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/4/2019 6:52 pm : link
In comment 14246976 smshmth8690 said:
Quote:
I cheated a couple of weeks ago, and picked up a box of fresh lasagne sheets from the "New York Ravioli Co.' I've got some left in the freezer, so this may be my Sunday dinner.


Heck I'm using dried boxed lasagna and YOU call using purchased fresh pasta "cheating"?

But I know what you mean, truly..
When I first opened Riera's Restaurant in Berkeley in 1982, we made all our pasta ourselves, for months, until we examined the cost efficiency of using our time in that manner, instead of buying someone else's fresh pasta and us making other things like special desserts or appetizers.

But in truth, the purchased pasta wasn't nearly so good as what we made ourselves following Marcella Hazan's recipe on our little Atlas hand crank pasta rolling machine. It just wasn't as delicate, prolly from overworking the gluten on an electric larger scale roller.

Then you have guys like Gary Danko who write that even using a small home scale pasta roller isn't nearly as good as rolled out by hand on a marble slab! Never did that myself just too labor intensive but I imagine it's true. I never had the luxury of a big over sized kitchen and a team of interns working for their room and board.

The dried Barilla egg lasagna is took thick and absorbs a bit too much liquid out of the bechamel, though I try to compensate with a looser bechamel.

But who the heck notices these things aside from guys and gals in whites and tocques...? Or formerly in those clothes?
I have a chilli story too.  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/4/2019 7:07 pm : link
Made one as a school donation for my kids' elementary school fair, but it was also a competition. Half the people at least bought supermarket ground beef for theirs, I cut up a NY strip into cubes, used 5-6 kinds of fresh peppers, lots of cumin, oregano, and good red wine or stock instead of water, canned Italian tomato pulp, fresh bay leaves...

The lady next to me asks me what's that smell? Prolly from the good cumin and copious good oregano, maybe the wine too, and then bends over and sticks her face over my Crock-Pot.

OMG, she said to me, "I'll never win anything if that's what people are submitting!"

To make her feel better I explained I'd once been a chef in well reputed French and Northern Italian restaurans.

My mistake! There was a lot of whispered grumbling about "unfair" and "rigged" when I won the professional judges' award of a night in a top hotel.

Lou, are those your wines in the picture?  
Bill in UT : 1/4/2019 7:30 pm : link
I'm pretty sure someone had a bottle of the black label Lewis Plasco here last week
Lou...  
BleedingBlue2 : 1/4/2019 7:58 pm : link
Can you tell me more about the bechamel you make? You just make a basic bechamel and then steep the herbs in there for a bit before putting through the sieve?
RE: Sunday Gravy and Balls...  
djm : 1/4/2019 8:15 pm : link
In comment 14247236 x meadowlander said:
Quote:
Sauce/Gravy/Whatever:
- 2 oz Veg Oil
- 1 Lb bone-in country style pork ribs
- 1 can tomato paste
- 3 fat cloves garlic, crushed
- 4 28oz cans Wegman's Organic crushed tomatoes
- at least 28 oz beef broth

Big pot. High heat, get oil going, brown ribs on both sides.
Remove ribs from pan, cut heat to low, give it a couple of minutes to cool so the garlic doesn't burn.
Garlic goes in for about 30 seconds.
Add tomato paste, deglaze bottom of pot with it, scraping the bits off the bottom. Work quick so garlic doesn't burn.
Tomatoes go in, all of em.
Add 28 oz beef broth, put the ribs back in.
Bring to a boil, lower heat and let it cook at LEAST 8 hours. If it gets overly thick, add more broth.
After an hour or so, begin seasoning to taste. I prefer to keep it simple, salt, pepper, oregano. Long sauce with all that pork and eventually meatballs will have plenty of flavor.

MEATBALLS:
- 4 slices white sandwich bread (no crusts)
- 1 cup buttermilk
- 2 lbs ground beef/pork/turkey (I prefer all beef)
- 1/2 cup GOOD parmesan cheese
- 3 tablespoons minced FRESH parsley
- 2 large egg yolks
- 2 small cloves garlic
- 1 teaspoon salt
- 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
- Vegetable oil
- Red Wine

Pour fat glass of red wine. Start drinkin'. :)
Use a food processor to make bread crumbs from the bread slices (no crusts).
In a large bowl, or better yet - Kitchen Aid Mixer bowl - add bread crumbs.
Add buttermilk to bowl, stir. After 5 minutes, bread crumbs have fully absorbed buttermilk.
Add egg yolks, parmesan, chopped parsley to bowl. Add meat, salt, pepper.
Roast ONE of the garlic cloves - in a frying pan, skin on for a few minutes.
Mince both the fresh and roasted clove - both go into the bowl.
If you have the Kitchen Aid, fire it up. Easy peasy. If not, wash your hands and go to town mixing it all well.
1/2 cup of meatball mixture per ball. Wet measuring cup works great. Shape each ball, put em on a large platter or pan, refrigerate for at least a half hour so they hold their shape better when you fry them.
Add 1/4" of vegetable oil to a cast iron pan. (Cast iron has mojo) Medium-High heat. Fry in smaller batches, no more than 8 or 9 per or you wind up with too much liquid, boiled balls instead of fried. I use 2 wooden spoons to turn. If there IS too much liquid, drain it, add and heat more oil and continue with the next batch.
When all balls are cooked, deglaze the pan with about a 1/4 cup of the red wine. Scrape browned bits.
IF what is now in that pan looks and smells delicious, add to the pot of sauce. If instead, it looks and smells like black, cigarette ash carbon, throw it out.

When there's about an hour til' dinner, put the balls and any other meats you want (cooked sausage, pepperoni, pork chops) into the sauce. Flavors both meat and sauce.

Fresh pasta is better.

And make sure you've got a loaf or two of killer Italian Bread.

Enjoy.


My goodness something tells me I can change the world with this shit. Thx I might just have to give this a go. I’ve got the vodka sauce and bolognese down pat but haven’t really tried to make a meatball gravy on my own.
My recipe is a combination of discussions...  
x meadowlander : 1/4/2019 9:19 pm : link
...with multiple Italian grammas.

Key to the sauce is TIME. Really needs to go all day, tomatoes really break down into a deep, sweet wonder. I usually start it as soon as I wake. Get the house stinking of garlic for the house to rise to, as my grandmother would do when I was a kid.
Btw, the ribs in my recipe disintegrate...  
x meadowlander : 1/4/2019 10:49 pm : link
...for the most part during cooking. At the end, there are some small, super tender, delicious pork chunks floating around. You'll want to remove the bones before serving.

Also, that sauce cooks at low heat and stir frequently so the sauce on the bottom doesn't burn.
RE: Btw, the ribs in my recipe disintegrate...  
PEEJ : 1/4/2019 10:57 pm : link
In comment 14247908 x meadowlander said:
Quote:
...for the most part during cooking. At the end, there are some small, super tender, delicious pork chunks floating around. You'll want to remove the bones before serving.

Also, that sauce cooks at low heat and stir frequently so the sauce on the bottom doesn't burn.


Country ribs are a great cut for gravy (and relatively cheap)
I use twice the amount of garlic and substitute basil for oregano

Hand crushed San Marzano tomatoes take any sauce to another level
RE: Lou...  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/5/2019 4:32 am : link
In comment 14247834 BleedingBlue2 said:
Quote:
Can you tell me more about the bechamel you make? You just make a basic bechamel and then steep the herbs in there for a bit before putting through the sieve?


Exactly that, or I just lift out the big parts of the herbs and spices I steep in the bechamel just before and as I spread it over each new layer of pasta. Bay leaves are easy to pick out with a slotted spoon or fork; thyme springs lift out, leaving the tiny leaves behind after 30+ minutes at a bare simmer.

The sauce itself is 3 tblsp butter, 4 tblsp flour, and about 1.25 liters of whole milk. Make a blonde roux over a low flame and just when it reaches maximum puffiness slowly add the pre-heated milk while whisking or stirring vigorously.

The necessity of straining depends on how lumpy or smooth the sauce itself is too.
RE: Lou, are those your wines in the picture?  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/5/2019 4:46 am : link
In comment 14247813 Bill in UT said:
Quote:
I'm pretty sure someone had a bottle of the black label Lewis Plasco here last week


The black label is my reserve level 2014, about to export some more to NY.

X meadowlander, awesome recipe for meatballs and gravy, but I have to make some kosher suitable substitutions. Beef short ribs for pork, demi-glace for buttermilk, (I make panade like that, or with simply reduced stock), no cheese at all, which of course takes something out of it...

Why egg yolk rather than just whole egg? Too light and puffy with the whites included?

Great recipe thanks for sharing.
Beez, have you ever considered pancetta, guanciale, or  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/5/2019 6:00 am : link
simply salt pork instead of bacon in your corn chowder?

Different flavor but metinks somewhat more true to the original recipes for chowder.

Great recipe BTW.
Can't stop rereading xmeadow's  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/5/2019 6:08 am : link
Meatballs and gravy recipe. Screw pasta, I want that on a crusty hoagie Sunday. For the games.
I’m not much of  
mattyblue : 1/5/2019 6:12 am : link
a cook but my Grandmother taught me to make an amazing Shepards Pie, I use beef instead of lamb though so technically it would be Cottage Pie. Very simple thing for anyone to make obviously but it’s still amazing.
RE: I’m not much of  
bigbluehoya : 1/5/2019 8:00 am : link
In comment 14247938 mattyblue said:
Quote:
a cook but my Grandmother taught me to make an amazing Shepards Pie, I use beef instead of lamb though so technically it would be Cottage Pie. Very simple thing for anyone to make obviously but it’s still amazing.


I freaking love shepherds pie and have had a hankering to try my hand at one. If you have some time to share the recipe at some point, I’d be much obliged.
That sounds..  
FatMan in Charlotte : 1/5/2019 11:45 am : link
like a plan!! I'm going to make them tomorrow

Quote:
Can't stop rereading xmeadow's
BlueLou'sBack : 6:08 am : link : reply
Meatballs and gravy recipe. Screw pasta, I want that on a crusty hoagie Sunday. For the games.


Damn you guys are making me hungry
Speaking of lamb  
idiotsavant : 1/5/2019 2:34 pm : link
I wonder if anyone's made X'ian style lamb.

The shop has gone from 1 in NYC, to 2.. now they are all over. Maybe 6 shops.

The cumin based lamb with handmade noodles to order.

Or at home, maybe just that type of space on lamb.
I have no idea what x'ian spice is and don't  
BlueLou'sBack : 1/6/2019 1:11 am : link
know the shops you mention. But for years now I have roasted lamb legs or shoulders covered liberally with ground Chinese 5 spices or the Mediterranean/North African "equivalent" the magical Ras al Hanut, which may be a blend of 10 or more spices, among which surely are cumin, cinnamon, and peppercorns as primary moieties.

Lamb joints cooked this way come out great "roasted" in an extra large brown in bag. By the time they are crispy brown at the surface, they are meltingly tender in the flesh.
Wow, lot of interesting recipes!  
oldhemi : 1/6/2019 8:10 am : link
Some of these I might just try. Some are beyond my ability and/or motivation.

I thought that I would be the only BBI'er who was fascinated by x medowlander's Sauce/gravy/whatever recipe with meatballs! Looks like a lot of my fellow knuckleheads are interested, too!

I have never used beef broth or pork ribs in one of my sauce variants. A lot to love in this version of Sunday Sauce! Thanks x man!
I’m surprised a chili recipe hasn’t been  
aimrocky : 1/6/2019 10:26 am : link
Posted. I jump between a few, but was hoping to try something different.

My best chili trick is smoking the ground beef.
My chili recipe I referenced above  
pjcas18 : 1/6/2019 10:28 am : link
isn't fancy, but it combines three meats.

3 lbs of ground beef
2 lbs of ground sausage (I use spicy Italian, but you can use mild or a different ground sausage)
1 lb of bacon

then I add a bunch of other ingredients, I can post if people care, but that mix is the base to a chili that has won awards.
Pjcas  
aimrocky : 1/6/2019 10:34 am : link
I’d like to see the other ingredients, if you wouldn’t mind posting them.
Here is the full recipe  
pjcas18 : 1/6/2019 10:42 am : link
it makes a very large pot, I use a dutch oven and this gets close to the top.

• 1 pound bacon, diced into 1-inch pieces
• 2 pounds hot Italian Sausage
• 3 pounds ground beef
• 4 jalapeno peppers, coarsely chopped
• 2 green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
• 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
• 2 large cans chili beans (I use black beans, kidney beans, pinto beans, it varies based on what I see in the store - kidney beans are my least favorite)
• 2 cans crushed tomatoes (about 30 oz)
• 3 pounds onion, finely chopped
• 1 can tomato sauce (large can)
• 1 tablespoon black pepper
• 3 tablespoons red chili powder
• 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
• 4 dashes hot sauce
• 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
• 1 cup water

depending on consistently I may or may not add the water.

In a large frying pan, cook bacon until crispy; drain and add to a large pot. Then brown the sausage in the frying pan; drain and add to pot with bacon. Then brown the ground beef; drain and add to the pot with the other meats. Add all the remaining ingredients to the pot, and simmer for 4 to 6 hours for best results.

serve hot with shredded cheddar cheese and sour cream as optional toppings.

and if my kids are the primary consumers I won't add the jalapenos I'll chop them up and put in a dish for people to add as a topping.

this chili has a good consistent heat, but also has great flavor.

I think the Worcestershire sauce is the secret ingredient.
Thanks!  
aimrocky : 1/6/2019 10:59 am : link
.
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