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NFT: 25 Years Ago Yesterday Green Day Dookie Released

St. Jimmy : 2/2/2019 3:23 pm
This album along with the Offspring's Smash brought a sound to the radio I had not heard much of besides a few Ramones' songs. It brought pop punk to the main stream in the mid to late 90s paving the way for bands like Rancid, Blink-182, the Mighty Mighty Bostones, No Doubt, and Jimmy Eat World to get air play. Introduced people to bands like not on the radio such as Screeching Weasel, the Bouncing Souls, NOFX, Operation Ivy, the Lifetime. People turned to Green Day's back catalog which made now defunct Lookout Records one of most successful independent labels of the 90s. Its release resulted in them being labelled sellouts and being ban from 924 Gilman Street where they got their start. It catapulted the band to being one of the main draws at Woodstock 94 and resulted in the signature moment of the festival with a mud fight between the band and the audience.

For me personally, it changed the music I listened to forever and introduced me to a lot of music I still listen today. Grew my CD collection from 20 CDs to over 300 which are still sitting in my basement to this day since being converted to MP3s. Led to me buying 5 guitars killing my interest in video games. The first time I heard Longview, I thought it was a piano playing throughout the song. It shows you how much I new about music before this album was released. My handle is a Green Day reference.

Dookie has gone on to sell 20 million copies. Green Day to date has sold over 85 million albums to date.

Below is an article on the making of the album and it's impact on music in the 90s and 2000s. Read it if you like. Or just join me in feeling old.
Link - ( New Window )
I loathe Green Day  
Coach Red Beaulieu : 2/2/2019 3:38 pm : link
Kind of part of the first wave of where music started sucking hard. Music's David Wilson.

Now Blink 182 was the shit, the last good musical act. Music's David Diehl or something.
Big  
XBRONX : 2/2/2019 3:40 pm : link
dookie sums up the music.
I remember  
eric2425ny : 2/2/2019 3:56 pm : link
When this album came out. Definitely a solid record. I still view the grunge era (STP, Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, etc.), which was also paralleled by the first wave of “gangsta rap” (Snoop, Dr. Dre, Wu-Tang Clan) as the best period of music in my lifetime, but Green Day did find a place in my music collection.
Some real hot takes so far.  
wigs in nyc : 2/2/2019 4:20 pm : link
Immense record, and hugely important to the rest of the late 90’s alternative music as mentioned. It will be interesting to see if Billie Joe Armstrong has a third act in him.
EVERYBODY in my dorm had this album  
The_Boss : 2/2/2019 4:22 pm : link
As you walked down the hall, you’d hear “when I come around” from like every other room.

As much as I find Green Day and their message "annoying"  
Route 9 : 2/2/2019 4:49 pm : link
in the later years, I still find them an enjoyable listen. Saw them in concert a couple years.

90s were a great time for music
A couple of years ago  
Route 9 : 2/2/2019 4:50 pm : link
...
Great album  
Les in TO : 2/2/2019 6:17 pm : link
And a fantastic live act.
Fuck  
Hsilwek92 : 2/2/2019 6:18 pm : link
I’m old.
While it was a groundbreaking album, I didn’t see the appeal  
Ssanders9816 : 2/2/2019 6:24 pm : link
Now American Idiot, that’s a fantastic album.
90s  
Mr. Nickels : 2/2/2019 7:11 pm : link
was such a great time
Dookie was good and very important  
Steve L : 2/2/2019 9:38 pm : link
But American Idiot is their signature album to me. Great songs from start to finish and good “story.”

Green Day was my kids’ first favorite band. We played American Idiot constantly and it was their first “big” concert when they were 11 or so. They are an awesome live band.

Want to see something good...check out the play “American Idiot.” Probably one of my favorite broadway shows.
American Idiot was their best work.  
St. Jimmy : 2/2/2019 10:47 pm : link
Before that it looked like they were burning out. Warning is a good album but didn't produce any classic songs. Nimrod of had Good Riddance but that was actually written around when a lot of the stuff on Dookie was written. Acoustic ballads didn't fit on Dookie. They had actually recorded another album before the recorded American Idiot called Cigarettes and Valentines which supposedly Reprise didn't like. After that the masters for it got stolen supposedly and they went to work on American Idiot where they got political because they were against the Gulf War. Therir albums since then have been just ok to me although Radio Revolution is probably the best of them.

As far as Dookie it was a polished version of what punk music in the East Bay sounded like. Of the bands from there at that time they were the most radio friendly. Rancid created some great music around that time too.

Of their albums I probably listen to Insomniac the most which I actually didn't like at first. It had more of an edge to it than Dookie. All the fallout and anger directed to them because they signed to a major label resulted in that album. They were pissed ofc and it showed.

During the Dookie tour their shows were pretty wild. They would antagonize the audience and Bille Joe would play naked. They had a band called Pansy Division opening for them. The crowds didn't take to kindly to them. I don't think they had the equipment to play bigger venues st the time. Or maybe it was the place I saw them because the sound quality was pretty bad. By the time they toured for Insomniac that was all worked out. My ears were ringing the next day after that show because it was so loud.
.....  
Route 9 : 2/2/2019 11:07 pm : link
Warning is one of the most underrated CDs ever, in my opinion.

American Idiot, lol. That brings me back to fall of 2004 when I was beginning of senior year of high school. I remember that day, getting the CD because I wasn't in school for whatever reason and listening with a handful of my buddies in the parking lot during the last period and after school. A bunch of people came over and started listening too, maybe 20 or so.

I listened to that CD so much for a couple yeara. The shelf life of American Idiot seemed as if it lasted forever, it was the predominant "main" music I had playing my car until late 2006 or so.

Homecoming/Whatsername is the best part
...  
christian : 2/3/2019 1:43 am : link
I don't want to knock Green Day. I loathe sanctimonious music criticism. They are successful band plenty of people like and seem to keep their music and message where their mouths have been from their start.

But that is a big pile of crap of an article. The writer conflates the trajectory of Bay Area and SoCal punk, which were both musically and chronologically dissimilar and would get you a boot in the shin at the time if you tried to pair them together.

There's also the obligatory, perfunctory grunge references, with no more relevance other than having roughly overlapped on MTV news for a brief time that summer.

Green Day probably had a commerical influence on later pop-punk as far major label appetite. I suspect there aren't a ton of bands that followed in 90s commercial success in that genre that would name Green Day as a big musical influence. Most of the bands that had commercial success in that general sound were LA, Long Beach, and Orange County bands with much more to do with Bad Religion and NOFX musically.

The one tether is the late, great Jerry Finn, who really honed a fantastic sound, mixing a and producing a number of great records during that period. And if you want to hear that come together really nicely on a full fledged grown up record check out the criminally underrated Years of Refusal - Morrissey album.
RE: ...  
St. Jimmy : 2/3/2019 7:21 am : link
In comment 14284920 christian said:
Quote:
I don't want to knock Green Day. I loathe sanctimonious music criticism. They are successful band plenty of people like and seem to keep their music and message where their mouths.

But that is a big pile of crap of an article. The writer conflates the trajectory of Bay Area and SoCal punk, which were both musically and chronologically dissimilar and would get you a boot in the shin at the time if you tried to pair them together.

There's also the obligatory, perfunctory grunge references, with no more relevance other than having roughly overlapped on MTV news for a brief time that summer.

Green Day probably had a commerical influence on later pop-punk as far major label appetite. I suspect there aren't a ton of bands that followed in 90s commercial success in that genre that would name Green Day as a big musical influence. Most of the bands that had commercial success in that general sound were LA, Long Beach, and Orange County bands with much more to do with Bad Religion and NOFX musically.

The one tether is the late, great Jerry Finn, who really honed a fantastic sound, mixing a and producing a number of great records during that period. And if you want to hear that come together really nicely on a full fledged grown up record check out the criminally underrated Years of Refusal - Morrissey album.
My initial exploration was on the was more into the Southern California music. It was more accessible to me. You could walk into the Wiz and buy Punk-O-Rama and hear Bad Religion, NOFX, and Pennywise and you could then buy some of their albums their. Lookout stuff was tougher to find or maybe just not yet known about by me. Maybe those Bbands were there and I just didn't know about them.

I would assume Social Distortion was on the radio too before Green Day. I just never picked up on them. Most music I discovered during the mid 80s was through my friend and mostly hair metal or Guns N' Roses.
Green Day/Blink 182 at the Garden  
aimrocky : 2/3/2019 7:37 am : link
Was my first concert, and it was amazing. I saw Incubus in Hartford shortly after that and loved it as well. That was a great time for music.

I’m a huge OAR fan, having seen them 40 times. Their lead singer, Marc Roberge, was on the Stern wrap up show last year and they asked him if he regrets coming on late. He said, all the time... Seeing bands with similar sounds, like Hootie, Third Eye Blind, Goo Goo Dolls, Foo Fighters and Dave Matthews still playing enormous venues has them thinking “what if”. I’m not saying OAR is on the same level as those bands, but it was a really great time for music.
....  
Route 9 : 2/3/2019 1:55 pm : link
I guess I get it for the times but I could never stand Blink-182 after Enema of the State. The worst was those spinoff bands. I got free tickets to one of those Angel's and Airwaves shows in 2006 or so in Atlantic City.

It was a fun time with friends goofing around with friends but whew what a terrible concert. Maybe worst music wise I've ever been to and that includes school talent shows. Haha.

I always hated Tom's weird voice more than anything.
My last year living in Northern Virginia  
pjcas18 : 2/3/2019 2:36 pm : link
I saw them at the annual HFStival.

Green Day, Foo Fighters, Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Wyclef Jean, Soul Coughing, Barenaked Ladies, B-52's, Everclear - and more (from what I remember - I went to a few of the HFstivals and some of the bands blend together, but I think that's it) fun concert.

Green Day closed it out.

...  
christian : 2/3/2019 11:45 pm : link
You could find a lot of people from the scene both in LA and North Berkeley who weren't thrilled a band like Green Day was the connection between their brand of punk rock and mainstream rock.

There were a lot of killer bands that got a little light shown on them because of it. That was a good thing for some. I never in my lifetime thought I'd hear Rancid or Agent Orange on the radio.

I'm not entirely sure I'd credit Green Day with the pop-punk popularity of the early 2000s, nor the pop-emo popularity either.

Again I'd say NOFX, Bad Religion, Pennywise and then bands like Texas is the Reason, Christie Front Drive, and Sunny Day Real Estate as bigger influences.
Haters gonna hate  
adamg : 2/3/2019 11:50 pm : link
.
Green Day was more pop than a lot of their predecessors.  
St. Jimmy : 2/4/2019 12:13 am : link
I remember thinking "Holy shit" the first time I heard Minor Threat. It was a step up from anything I had found from the bands that were around in the 90s.

One band which I think had a big influence on early 2000s punk rock which was on the radio was the Lifetime. You hear a lot of what they did on Hello Bastards and Jersey's Best Dancers in certain bands which made it to the airwaves in the early 2000s.
RE: ....  
St. Jimmy : 2/4/2019 12:22 am : link
In comment 14285227 Route 9 said:
Quote:
I guess I get it for the times but I could never stand Blink-182 after Enema of the State. The worst was those spinoff bands. I got free tickets to one of those Angel's and Airwaves shows in 2006 or so in Atlantic City.

It was a fun time with friends goofing around with friends but whew what a terrible concert. Maybe worst music wise I've ever been to and that includes school talent shows. Haha.

I always hated Tom's weird voice more than anything.
That is pretty much how I felt. I loved Cheshire Cat. Dude Ranch was ok. Enema of the State lost me. They did become a huge band with Enema of the State and their follow up to that. So I'm sure they didn't miss me.
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