for display only
Big Blue Interactive The Corner Forum  
Back to the Corner

Archived Thread

Thursday Media Transcript: S Jabrill Peppers

Eric from BBI : Admin : 10/3/2019 3:57 pm
S Jabrill Peppers -- October 3, 2019

Q: You are now listed as the top punt returner. After getting the ball in your hands and scoring last week, how much are you itching to do that again with that opportunity now?
A: Any way I can have an impact on the game, Iím going to try to do my due diligence to make sure I impact the game. So, just like I told you guys last week, Iím not going to press the issue, Iím going to wait for my pitch to hit, and protect the ball and do what Iíve got to do to help this team.

Q: Theyíve god a lot of good skill position playersóreceivers, running backsóis there a priority for your defense of which to try to shut down first?
A: Stop what they do well and react to everything else.

Q: You guys made a change last week where Rabbit (Janoris Jenkins) stayed on one side of the field and DeAndre Baker stayed on one side of the field, rather than Rabbit following one receiver around. How do you think that helped things in the secondary?
A: Personally, those guys are both qualified, so I think it was more so, like I said, the attention to detail and us just going out there and executing. Thatís really it.

Q: Thereís some frustration on the Vikingsí side right now with their passing attack, receivers arenít happy. Can you use that to your advantage as far as being aggressive and attacking, knowing theyíre kind of already there mentally?
A: Well, we know theyíre going to take some shots this week. Kirk (Cousins) has already apologized to those guys, so we know heís going to look to get them the ball more. So, we definitely know we have a tall task ahead of us, especially with Dalvin Cook, whoís one of the best backs in the league right now, running the way heís running, and itís opening up their bootleg game and play-action pass. So, we definitely have to be on our keys, lock in, alignment and assignment, and just execute the game plan, thatís all it comes down to.

Q: I like that you know whatís going on over thereódoes that help when youíre paying attention and not just watching film here.
A: Yeah, youíve got to. Youíve got to pay attention to everything.

Q: Some guys would say it doesnít matter and weíve just got to watch the film--
A: At the end of the day, it doesnít matter, but you have to know what to expect. He knows he has playmakers, theyíve voiced their opinions, and heís going to try to get his playmakers the ball. I donít think thatís worrying too much or anything like that, but thatís just the reality of the situation.

Q: What do you like about the setup where you have three safeties on the field there and youíre playing that linebacker role?
A: They canít really account for whoís who, what position Iím playing or Mike (Thomas) is playing, or whoever the third safety isówhether itís Sean (Chandler), Grant (Haley), Julian (Love). I think it helps pre-snap and post-snap, the disguises, it makes the read a little muddy for the quarterback. But Kirkís been doing this a while, so we definitely have to mix up the looks a bit, but I think thatís the main thing I like about it.
I love this interview  
5BowlsSoon : 10/3/2019 4:07 pm : link
I love Mr Peppers! Glad to have you, amigo!
The Big Nickel!  
Milton : 10/3/2019 4:08 pm : link
It's my favorite defense! DB Coach DeWayne Walker was the first to introduce it to the Giants defense (as far as I can tell). Belichick started deploying it with the Patriots around the same time.

Here's a little history on it (as best as I could find) from Bucky Brooks (dated august 2014)...
Quote:
During my time as a defensive back with the Green Bay Packers, I had the opportunity to watch defensive coordinator Fritz Shurmur work his magic on the blackboard each week, designing clever schemes to slow down the opponent. One of the ideas that he used to help the Packers field the NFL's top-ranked defense in 1996 was a unique nickel defense that featured three safeties (Eugene Robinson, Mike Prior and LeRoy Butler) on the field simultaneously. Although it wasn't unusual to use five defensive backs on obvious passing downs, Shurmur's willingness to play Butler -- Green Bay's starting strong safety -- as a nickel back allowed him to deploy his best defensive back in coverage on tight ends and slot receivers, while also using him on blitzes off the edge. The strategy helped the '96 Packers hold opponents to just 13.1 points per game and total 26 interceptions against only 12 touchdown passes allowed.

Fast forward to 2014. Defensive coordinators searching for effective solutions against the spread-formation run game and the hybrid tight ends dominating the NFL are resorting to big nickel tactics that mimic Shurmur's ingenious scheme from the mid-'90s. From Perry Fewell using the package to help the New York Giants match up against their NFC East rivals, to Rob Ryan unveiling a three-safety defense to take advantage of burgeoning superstar Kenny Vaccaro, the big nickel package is en vogue and will be a major part of defensive game plans this fall.
Good to hear we're mixing it up with 3 safeties  
Coach Red Beaulieu : 10/3/2019 4:33 pm : link
especially with injured LBs.
RE: The Big Nickel!  
Joey in VA : 10/3/2019 7:47 pm : link
In comment 14610838 Milton said:
Quote:
It's my favorite defense! DB Coach DeWayne Walker was the first to introduce it to the Giants defense (as far as I can tell). Belichick started deploying it with the Patriots around the same time.

Here's a little history on it (as best as I could find) from Bucky Brooks (dated august 2014)...

Quote:


During my time as a defensive back with the Green Bay Packers, I had the opportunity to watch defensive coordinator Fritz Shurmur work his magic on the blackboard each week, designing clever schemes to slow down the opponent. One of the ideas that he used to help the Packers field the NFL's top-ranked defense in 1996 was a unique nickel defense that featured three safeties (Eugene Robinson, Mike Prior and LeRoy Butler) on the field simultaneously. Although it wasn't unusual to use five defensive backs on obvious passing downs, Shurmur's willingness to play Butler -- Green Bay's starting strong safety -- as a nickel back allowed him to deploy his best defensive back in coverage on tight ends and slot receivers, while also using him on blitzes off the edge. The strategy helped the '96 Packers hold opponents to just 13.1 points per game and total 26 interceptions against only 12 touchdown passes allowed.

Fast forward to 2014. Defensive coordinators searching for effective solutions against the spread-formation run game and the hybrid tight ends dominating the NFL are resorting to big nickel tactics that mimic Shurmur's ingenious scheme from the mid-'90s. From Perry Fewell using the package to help the New York Giants match up against their NFC East rivals, to Rob Ryan unveiling a three-safety defense to take advantage of burgeoning superstar Kenny Vaccaro, the big nickel package is en vogue and will be a major part of defensive game plans this fall.

wrong wrong wrong. We used it in SB 25, we started 2 DL, 3 LBs and 6 DBs ,(Collins and Walls at CB, Jackson and Guyton at S and Perry Williams at nickel CB and Reyna Thompson at nickel S). To combat the Bills red gun offense, we started in a big nickel. 1996 was six years after we used it.
RE: RE: The Big Nickel!  
Motley Two : 10/3/2019 10:12 pm : link
In comment 14611063 Joey in VA said:
Quote:
In comment 14610838 Milton said:


Quote:


It's my favorite defense! DB Coach DeWayne Walker was the first to introduce it to the Giants defense (as far as I can tell). Belichick started deploying it with the Patriots around the same time.

Here's a little history on it (as best as I could find) from Bucky Brooks (dated august 2014)...

Quote:


During my time as a defensive back with the Green Bay Packers, I had the opportunity to watch defensive coordinator Fritz Shurmur work his magic on the blackboard each week, designing clever schemes to slow down the opponent. One of the ideas that he used to help the Packers field the NFL's top-ranked defense in 1996 was a unique nickel defense that featured three safeties (Eugene Robinson, Mike Prior and LeRoy Butler) on the field simultaneously. Although it wasn't unusual to use five defensive backs on obvious passing downs, Shurmur's willingness to play Butler -- Green Bay's starting strong safety -- as a nickel back allowed him to deploy his best defensive back in coverage on tight ends and slot receivers, while also using him on blitzes off the edge. The strategy helped the '96 Packers hold opponents to just 13.1 points per game and total 26 interceptions against only 12 touchdown passes allowed.

Fast forward to 2014. Defensive coordinators searching for effective solutions against the spread-formation run game and the hybrid tight ends dominating the NFL are resorting to big nickel tactics that mimic Shurmur's ingenious scheme from the mid-'90s. From Perry Fewell using the package to help the New York Giants match up against their NFC East rivals, to Rob Ryan unveiling a three-safety defense to take advantage of burgeoning superstar Kenny Vaccaro, the big nickel package is en vogue and will be a major part of defensive game plans this fall.



wrong wrong wrong. We used it in SB 25, we started 2 DL, 3 LBs and 6 DBs ,(Collins and Walls at CB, Jackson and Guyton at S and Perry Williams at nickel CB and Reyna Thompson at nickel S). To combat the Bills red gun offense, we started in a big nickel. 1996 was six years after we used it.


Correct.

Belichick said something along the lines of we may have to let Thurman Thomas run for 100 yards to win this game. The defense was part of getting the Bills to do just that.
Allow the Bills to make their plays, but use the Giants physicality to punish their players every time they got the ball, but don't get shredded by the big plays.
Back to the Corner